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Howard Zinn: Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Whiskeygonebad via Flickr

It’s that time of the year again. In case you missed reading this, here it is again.

by
Writer, Dandelion Salad
October 12, 2009

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log: Continue reading

The City on the Hill: America, Exceptionalism and Redemptive Violence by Lesley Docksey

by Lesley Docksey
Writer, Dandelion Salad
England
September 17, 2013

IMG_1140

Image by Mikasi via Flickr

“…we must consider that we shall be as a City upon a Hill, the eyes of all people upon us; so that if we shall deal falsely with our God in this work we have undertaken and so cause him to withdraw his present help from us, we shall be made a story and a byword through the world, we shall open the mouths of enemies to speak evil of the ways of God and all professors for Gods sake; we shall shame the faces of many of God’s worthy servants, and cause their prayers to be turned into curses upon us till we be consumed out of the good land whither we are going.” — John Winthrop 1630

Continue reading

The Indian Uprising — The Fall of Empire by William T. Hathaway

THE FACE OF IMPERIALISM

Image by vaticanus via Flickr

by William T. Hathaway
Writer, Dandelion Salad
July 26, 2013

“The Indian Uprising” by Donald Barthelme is an iconic short story of the 1960s heralding the defeat of the US empire and the end of white male dominance. Written as the USA was mired in a hopeless war, as Native-Americans and African-Americans were rebelling against oppression, and as women were breaking out of the traditional roles they had been confined to, the story predicted the victory of these insurgents over the feeble old order. Its experimental style full of dislocations and dissolutions captured the postmodern zeitgeist.

Continue reading

Andrew Gavin Marshall: Indigenous Occupy: Why We Should All Be Idle No More

by Andrew Gavin Marshall
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
http://andrewgavinmarshall.com
January 12, 2013

Idle No More - Panasonic Lumix FZ20 - 3/45

Image by russellmcneil via Flickr

The following is my latest interview from Russia Today.

An indigenous movement known as ‘Idle No More’ is gaining momentum in Canada. The First Nations people have promised to bring the country’s economy ‘down to its knees’ if aboriginals’ voices remain unheard.

Having begun with four members in November, Idle No More has now become reminiscent of other grassroots movements like Occupy Wall Street.

Continue reading

Corporate Culture and Global Empire: Food Crisis, Land Grabs, Poverty, Slums, Environmental Devastation and Resistance by Andrew Gavin Marshall

by Andrew Gavin Marshall
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
http://andrewgavinmarshall.com
January 7, 2013

Idle No More: Indigenous drummers

Image by jonathonreed via Flickr

Corporate power is immense. The world’s largest corporation is Royal Dutch Shell, surpassed in wealth only by the 24 largest countries on earth. Of the 150 largest economic entities in the world, 58% are corporations. Corporations are institutionally totalitarian, the result of power’s resistance to the democratic revolution, which was begrudgingly accepted in the political sphere, but denied the economic sphere, and thus was denied a truly democratic society. Continue reading

The Stimulator: Anarchy in Puerto Rico

Dandelion Salad

http://submedia.tv
Jan. 3, 2013

This week:

1. Zapatistas Rising
2. Idle No More stops the flows
3. New year’s eve noise demo
Continue reading

Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn (repost)

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Whiskeygonebad via Flickr

It’s that time of the year again. In case you missed reading this, here it is again.

by
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
October 12, 2009

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log: Continue reading

Time to Get Crazy by Chris Hedges

by Chris Hedges
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Truthdig July 2, 2012

Crazy Horse

Image by Mike Tigas via Flickr

Native Americans’ resistance to the westward expansion of Europeans took two forms. One was violence. The other was accommodation. Neither worked. Their land was stolen, their communities were decimated, their women and children were gunned down and the environment was ravaged. There was no legal recourse. There was no justice. There never is for the oppressed. And as we face similar forces of predatory, unchecked corporate power intent on ruthless exploitation and stripping us of legal and physical protection, we must confront how we will respond.

Continue reading

Welcome to the Asylum by Chris Hedges

by
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Truthdig
April 30, 2012 Continue reading

Bill Moyers Journal: Andrew J. Bacevich + Louise Erdrich

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Bill Moyers Journal
April 9, 2010

Andrew J. Bacevich

Historian, international relations expert and former US Army Colonel Andrew J. Bacevich returns to the JOURNAL to discuss America’s long war in Afghanistan.

Continue reading

One Giant Rez by William Norman Grigg

Dandelion Salad

Crossposted at Thomas Paine’s Corner thanks, Jason.

“What’s happening in my country is also happening in your country…. You don’t even know it, but you’re the Indians of the 21st Century, and that’s very sad.”

–Russell Means, Indian Activist and Facilitator of the newly created Independent Republic of Lakota.

by William Norman Grigg

1/2/09

Editor’s Note: Israel’s ongoing efforts to annihilate the Palestinians are quite reminiscent of the Native American Genocide….

Shortly before the U.S. Army slaughtered hundreds of starving, desperate Sioux who had been herded to the frozen shore of Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota, the Census Bureau announced the disappearance of a contiguous frontier line for the first time in American history.

Manifest Destiny had run out of room, and the American Empire – a term used unblushingly in triumphalist literature of the period – now girded the entire North American continent, and its rulers were free to confer the blessings of civilization on untutored masses beyond our shores.

Continue reading