CIA Crucified captive in Abu Ghraib Prison by Sherwood Ross

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by Sherwood Ross
Global Research, June 28, 2009

The Central Intelligence Agency crucified a prisoner in Abu Ghraib prison near Baghdad, according to a report published in The New Yorker magazine.

“A forensic examiner found that he (the prisoner) had essentially been crucified; he died from asphyxiation after having been hung by his arms, in a hood, and suffering broken ribs,” the magazine’s Jane Mayer writes in the magazine’s June 22nd issue. “Military pathologists classified the case a homicide.” The date of the murder was not given.

“No criminal charges have ever been brought against any C.I.A. officer involved in the torture program, despite the fact that at least three prisoners interrogated by agency personnel died as a result of mistreatment,” Mayer notes.

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Mind control is no conspiracy theory By Roland Michel Tremblay

Roland Michel Tremblay

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By Roland Michel Tremblay
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
The Marginal
23 June, 2009

If humanity was on trial, or at the very least our governments past and present, the prosecution would certainly order a bad character application, also perhaps a psychiatric report, and it would not be pretty. The list of antecedents, past offences, would be infinite. The pre-sentence report would certainly state prison for life, and suggest just about every single rehabilitation programme there is, once behind bars. But what about if you were on trial?

I read somewhere that character could be defined as “attributes that determine a person’s moral and ethical actions and reactions”. I usually make up my own definitions, especially that when I did a quick search, the word character could be defined in over 20 different ways. Here I mean attitude toward life and others, our reactions, our actions. These need to be kept in check, this is the mark of order in any society.

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Mohammed El-Gharani, Guantánamo’s youngest prisoner, speaks to al-Jazeera by Andy Worthington

by Andy Worthington
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
www.andyworthington.co.uk
28 June 2009

Speaking for the first time since his release from Guantánamo after seven years’ imprisonment without charge or trial, following a successful habeas corpus appeal in January, Mohammed El-Gharani, now a free man in Chad, told Mohamed Vall of al-Jazeera, in an exclusive interview, how he felt about being imprisoned from the age of 14 to the age of 21. “Seven of the most beautiful years of youth were lost in prison,” he said. “I couldn’t learn or work. Seven years were just lost — for nothing.” Recounting the torture he experienced, which I reported last April in my article, “Guantánamo’s forgotten child: the sad story of Mohammed El-Gharani,” Mohammed also revealed, for the first time, that the interrogators in Guantánamo tried to force him to spy on his fellow prisoners. Continue reading

New National Holiday In Iraq! US Troop Withdrawal Day!

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http://earth2obama.org/
June 28, 2009 CNN

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US reneges on Iraq withdrawal promises

Rachel Maddow: Mission Accomplished!

Military Coup in Honduras + Father Roy: Inside the School of Assassins (2008)

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SOA Watch
http://www.soaw.org/
June 28, 2009

A military coup has taken place in Honduras this morning (Sunday, June 28), led by School of the Americas (SOA) graduate Romeo Vasquez. In the early hours of the day, members of the Honduran military surrounded the presidential palace and forced the democratically elected president, Manuel Zelaya, into custody. He was immediately flown to Costa Rica.

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