Chris Hedges: The Pathology of the Rich

Ways of Thinking - Feudalism is very much alive

Image by Judite B via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Nov 25, 2021

On the show this week, Chris Hedges discusses the peculiar pathology of the rich and our oligarchic state with Chris Lehmann, editor-at-large for The New Republic.

“The rich are different from us,” F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked to Ernest Hemingway, to which Hemingway allegedly replied, “Yes, they have more money.” The exchange, although it never took place, sums up a wisdom Fitzgerald had that eluded Hemingway. The rich are different. The cocoon of wealth and privilege permits the rich to turn those around them into compliant workers, hangers-on, servants, flatterers, and sycophants. Wealth breeds, as Fitzgerald illustrated in ‘The Great Gatsby’ and his short story “The Rich Boy,” a class of people for whom human beings are disposable commodities.

“Colleagues, associates, employees, kitchen staff, servants, gardeners, tutors, personal trainers, even friends and family, bend to the whims of the wealthy or disappear. “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy,” Fitzgerald wrote of the wealthy couple at the center of Gatsby’s life. “They smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made.”

Aristotle, Niccolò Machiavelli, Alexis de Tocqueville, Adam Smith, and Karl Marx all began from the premise there is a natural antagonism between the rich and the masses. “Those who have too much of the goods of fortune, strength, wealth, friends, and the like, are neither willing nor able to submit to authority,” Aristotle wrote in ‘Politics.’ “The evil begins at home; for when they are boys, by reason of the luxury in which they are brought up, they never learn, even at school, the habit of obedience.”

Oligarchs, these philosophers knew, are schooled in the mechanisms of manipulation, subtle and overt repression, and exploitation to protect their wealth and power at our expense. Foremost among their mechanisms of control is the control of ideas. Ruling elites ensure that the established intellectual class is subservient to an ideology – in this case free market capitalism and globalization – that justifies their greed. “The ruling ideas are nothing more than the ideal expression of the dominant material relationships,” Marx wrote, “the dominant material relationships grasped as ideas.”

Chris Lehmann, an editor-at-large for The New Republic and The Baffler, and the author of Rich People Things.

From the archives:

The Tragedy of the Worker, by Aragorn Eloff

Chris Hedges and Richard D. Wolff: Competing Systems of Power in America: Autocracy or Oligarchy

Capitalism and Alienation, by Yanis Iqbal

The Anti-Social Socialist: What is the Connection Between Narcissism and Capitalism?

The United States of Greed and Bullies

Mystery: How Wealth Creates Poverty in the World by Michael Parenti

The Spirit Level: Why Greater Equality Makes Societies Stronger + How Economic Inequality Harms Societies (must see)

Make No Mistake: The Rule Of The Rich Has Been A Deadly Epoch For Humanity

Wealth Belongs To All Of Us – Not Just To The Rich by Dariel Garner

We Are So Poor Because They Are So Rich by Dariel Garner

4 thoughts on “Chris Hedges: The Pathology of the Rich

  1. Pingback: Max Lawson: World’s Richest Doubled Their Wealth While Millions Fell Into Poverty – Dandelion Salad

  2. Pingback: Reflecting on the Dawn of Everything, by David Swanson – Dandelion Salad

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