Chris Hedges: The Humanity of the Marginalized

Chris Hedges: The Humanity of the Marginalized

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on May 21, 2017

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges is joined by Russell Banks, author of Cloudsplitter, The Sweet Hereafter and Lost Memory of Skin. In his books, screenplays and short stories, Banks uncovers the humanity of the marginalized. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil explores deindustrialization in the US.

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Chris Hedges: Artists As Prophets

Guernica - Picasso

image by damian entwistle via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Apr 29, 2017

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges discusses the role of the artist with Enrique Martinez Celaya. The sculptor, painter, physicist and philosopher’s work focuses on the struggle of individuals to navigate the inner and outer realms of darkness that negate our individuality. RT correspondent Anya Parampil looks at Pablo Picasso’s Guernica, one of the most controversial paintings of the 20th century.

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The Omnipresent Pressure to Conform by Graham Peebles

Mobile Phones And Abercrombie

Image by Garry Knight via Flickr

by Graham Peebles
Writer, Dandelion Salad
London, England
April 26, 2017

It was the school holidays and there were lots of teenagers in my local park. I sometimes spot them meandering home, but I rarely see them en masse as it were. Blind to the bluebells, peacocks and glories of nature all around us, they were glued to their palm-sized screens. What were they so engrossed in – some kind of game or trivial video, a map of the park perhaps, unnecessary given the proliferation of signs? Are they texting, e-mailing, or trawling through the Internet, or all of the above? If one did not know what these shiny seductive objects were, one might think that they controlled the person, rather than the other way round. And to a large degree they do.

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Lukomorye: Poets Pave the Road to the Golden Age by Gaither Stewart

_DSC0750

Image by Luxus M via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
April 13, 2017

The recent death of the Russian poet with whom I was acquainted, Yevgheny Yevtushenko, prompted these considerations of the role of poets in social-cultural-political progress in general and in a particularly spectacular fashion in Russia. In few other countries have poets played a more significant than in Russia. Nonetheless, for centuries Russian poets have been harassed, persecuted, and punished for their songs. Dostoevsky imprisoned, Pushkin exiled, Yesenin, Mayakovsky and Tsvetaeva suicides, Mandelshtam and others perished in the cultural events of 1937. Poets seldom lead easy lives anywhere. The poet sees the ideals but he must flee from the world in order to rejoice in them and he cannot remain unaffected by the caricatures of these ideals around him.

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Abby Martin: The Sikh Experience in America

Abby Martin -- The Sikh Experience in America

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Abby Martin

teleSUR English on Mar 22, 2017

People of the Sikh faith, commonly mistaken for both Muslims and Hindus, are frequent targets of bigoted hate crimes—in fact, the first victim of post-9/11 hate crimes was a Sikh man. In 2016, attacks against Muslims—and people perceived to be Muslims, in particular Sikhs—has reached an all-time high.

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Socialism: Creating a World to Change Our Lives by Sam Friedman

Capitalism isn't working

Image by Cary Bass-Deschenes via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

Republished with permission from Solidarity and Against The Current

by Sam Friedman
Solidarity and Against The Current, January-February 2017, #186
January 10, 2017

THERE IS A growing suspicion among many people involved in movements against war, for social justice, and for an ecologically sustainable society that capitalism can only create a world of war, injustice and environmental destruction. There is widespread and growing understanding that the current social order cannot continue without catastrophe occurring —yet we lack a vision of what might replace it.

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Chris Hedges: Standing Rock Resistance (#NoDAPL)

IMG_1515

Image by Dark Sevier via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT on Nov 26, 2016

On a special edition of On Contact, Chris Hedges travels to the Standing Rock encampment in North Dakota to listen to the frontline voices of those fighting to block the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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An Extreme Form of Capitalism is the Ideological Framework of This Divided World by Graham Peebles

Dear Capitalism...

Image by Anirvan via Flickr

by Graham Peebles
Writer, Dandelion Salad
London, England
November 19, 2016

Civilization In Transition, Uncertainty and Opportunity

British filmmaker Adam Curtis recently released his new documentary ‘HyperNormalisation’. [See video below.] Brilliant in parts, this ambitious film reveals an image of a civilisation in turmoil. It shows how duplicitous, inadequate politicians have repeatedly deceived the public over the last forty years, and how their actions have caused increasing levels of chaos in the world, which they are unable to resolve. “We live in a strange time, extraordinary events keep happening that undermine the stability of our world,” the director declares, and yet, “those in control seem unable to deal with them. Nobody has any vision of a different or better kind of future.”

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Chris Hedges: Confronting the Signs of a Society in Decline

World War 3 - III

Image by r2hox via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

Depth Psychology Alliance on Sep 14, 2016

In this depth psychology oriented discussion powered by Pacifica Graduate Institute, Pulitzer Prize Winning Journalist Chris Hedges speaks with Depth Psychologist, Bonnie Bright, Ph.D, about how, as both individuals and civilizations, we encounter cycles of growth, maturation, decadence, and decay, and death.

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Marxism in Noir By Alan Wald

another late night

Image by i k o via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

By Alan Wald
International Socialist Review
July 11, 2016

The culture and politics of race and class struggle in the 1940s

No one knows better than socialist activists of the twenty-first century that each generation must face its own “crisis” of Marxism. But we don’t face this challenge to our theory and social movements just as we please. The way we remember our past governs our own dreams for the future. Above all, at a moment like today, when thousands of newly radicalizing young people know pretty much what they are fighting against, but are unclear about what they are fighting for, there is no point in simply pummeling the gates of history with one’s fists. Sooner or later, we look to the past for shared, or at least recognizable, political experiences that might be retrofitted and rebooted; tactics and strategies that have succeeded or failed; causes and explanations for economic and social trends that have persisted or morphed; and even role models, candidly reported, for how to live our chosen lives as Marxists. Marxism doesn’t embalm history; it seeks to join a living past to present changes.

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Russian Intellectuals and the Intelligentsia by Gaither Stewart

Moscow August 2011

Image by Deck Accessory via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
May 27, 2016

The Determinant Class of Contemporary Russian History

Russia! What a marvelous phenomenon on the world scene! Russia!—a distance of ten thousand versts (about two-thirds of a mile) in length on a straight line from the virtually central European river, across all of Asia and the Eastern Ocean, down to the remote American lands! A distance of five thousand versts in width from Persia, one of the southern Asiatic states, to the end of the inhabited world—to the North Pole. What state can equal it? Its half? How many states can equal its twentieth, its fiftieth part? … Russia—a state which contains all types of soil, from the warmest to the coldest, from the burning environs of Erivan to icy Lapland, which abounds in all the products required for the needs, comforts, and pleasures of life, in accordance with its present state of development—a whole world, self-sufficient, independent, absolute. — Mikhail P. Pogodin- 1800-1875, Russian historian, journalist, intellectual of the Slavophile movement who held to the Norman theory that the Rus people from whom Russians descended, were Scandinavians.

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Chris Hedges and Josh Fox: What Climate Can’t Change

Josh Fox

Image by Linh Do via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

teleSUR English on Apr 18, 2016

In this episode of Days of Revolt, Chris Hedges interviews documentary filmmaker Josh Fox, who directed the new film “How to Let Go of the World”. The two discuss the catastrophe of climate change, and the role of art and culture in helping us embrace what climate can’t change.

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The Downsides of Cheap Abundance by Ralph Nader

Never Let Me Go

Image by KROCKY MESHKIN via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Ralph Nader
The Nader Page
October 22, 2015

In college, Economics 101 is often described as the social science discipline that deals with the production, distribution and consumption of goods and services. MIT Economist Paul Samuelson liked to focus on scarcity, or more specifically, the allocation of scarce resources. “Abundance” was always a pretty word with an idyllic connotation for Professor Samuelson. I often wonder why there weren’t a few classes about the real-life consequences of abundance, along with scarcity and people’s material welfare.

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Biosocial and Epigenetic Relativity of Human Nature: Relative to Political Economy, Technology, and Culture by Fazal Rahman, Ph.D.

Pepetela - "O quase fim do mundo" ("Almost the world's end")

Image by Pedro Ribeiro Simões via Flickr

by Fazal Rahman, Ph.D.
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published on imperialismandthethirdworld, Sept. 7, 2015; written 1982
September 9, 2015, revised September 11, 2015

“It is a question of the Third World starting a new history of Man, a history which will have regard to the sometimes prodigious theses which Europe has put forward, but which will also not forget Europe’s crimes, of which the most horrible was committed in the heart of man, and consisted of the pathological tearing apart of his functions and the crumbling away of his unity.”
Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth, (Fanon, 1963, p. 315).

“We all live under the constant threat of our own annihilation. Only by the most outrageous violation of ourselves have we achieved our capacity to live in relative adjustment to a civilization apparently driven to its own destruction.”
R. D. Laing, The Politics of Experience/The Bird of Paradise (R.D. Laing, 1967)

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What’s a Slum? by Michael Parenti

by Michael Parenti
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Michael Parenti Blog
www.michaelparenti.org
January 5, 2014

Claudio's Barber Shop

Image by joseph a via Flickr

When I was about thirteen-years-old I chanced upon an article in  Henry Luce’s Life magazine that described East Harlem (a Manhattan working class neighborhood)  as “a slum inhabited by beggar‑poor Italians, Negroes, and Puerto Ricans,” words that stung me and wedged in my memory.

“We live in a slum,” I mournfully reported to my father.

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