Plutocracy III: Class War (must-see)

Plutocracy III: Class War

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

Scott N June 2017

Income inequality has become a big issue in the modern day political spectrum. While these economic and class divides seem more pronounced than ever before, this documentary film Plutocracy: Political Repression in the USA reveals the main reasons of these struggles pre-date the beginnings of the industrialized labor force.

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When The Revolution Comes by Gaither Stewart

LC-DIG-nclc-01342 Girl Warping Machine, Loray Mill, Gastonia, N.C.

Image by Children’s Bureau Centennial via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
Previously published August 8, 2011
June 22, 2017

The Historical Gastonia Textile Mill Strikes Are Not Forgotten

When in the early part of this millennium I was writing a rather surrealistic novel, ASHEVILLE, about the town in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina where I started out my life, I ran into the story of the Asheville-based self-professed Communist writer, Olive Tilford Dargan, of whom I had never heard before. Visiting then her gravesite in the little known Green Hills Cemetery in West Asheville and researching her and her activities I fell into a gossamer review of early 19th century labor struggles in the good old U.S. South.

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Abby Martin: Sabotage, Not Socialism, is the Problem in Venezuela

Abby Martin: Sabotage, Not Socialism, is the Problem in Venezuela

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Abby Martin

teleSUR English on Jun 17, 2017

Today in the corporate media, Venezuela’s economic problems are used to paint the country as a failed state, in need of foreign-backed regime change.

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To the Barricades Comrades? by William Bowles

Jeremy Corbyn graffiti, Camden

Image by duncan c via Flickr

by William Bowles
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Investigating Imperialism
London, England
June 16, 2017

“From nowhere, a grassroots power base of [60,000] left-wing activists overturned Blair’s 20-year “New Labour” project, which took the party into the Clintonite center ground, and ultimately to three straight general election victories, No.10 Downing Street, and government. As the leader of Britain’s main opposition, Corbyn is technically the next prime minister in waiting. This is not a trivial achievement.

“It has left his party’s establishment stunned.” –  ‘Momentum: The Inside story of how Corbyn took control of the Labour Party‘, Business Insider, March 3, 2016

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Chris Hedges: My Goal Is The Utter Destruction Of This Corporate Kleptocracy, interviewed by Joe Sacco

I Will Stand With The Most Vulnerable

Image by Lorie Shaull via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

KBOO Radio on Jun 7, 2017

Truthdig columnist & Pulitzer Prize–winner Chris Hedges and Portland-based award-winning cartoonist and journalist Joe Sacco spoke at The Aladdin Theater in Portland, Oregon on May 27th, 2017 — the day after the horrific hate crime occurred on the MAX.

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Abby Martin: World Ignores Opposition Violence at Venezuela Protests + Abby Martin on Death Threats Against Her

Abby Martin Venezuela

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Abby Martin

TheRealNews on Jun 10, 2017

Empire Files host Abby Martin just returned from Venezuela where she saw first hand how violent opposition protesters attempt to intimidate reporters and thereby give a false impression of what is happening.

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Chris Hedges, Richard Wolff and Kate Crehan at The Left Forum 2017: Gramsci’s Importance for the Left Today

Thomas Hirschhorn, Gramsci Monument, 2013

Image by Andrew Russeth via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges, and

OpenUnivoftheLeft on Jun 5, 2017

Left Forum 2017, Gramsci’s Importance for the Left Today, John Jay College, CUNY, 6-2-2017, New York City, Laura Flanders, Chair, The Laura Flanders Show, Chris Hedges, Truthdig, On Contact RT, Richard D. Wolff, Democracy at Work; Left Forum, Kate Crehan, College of Staten Island, Graduate Center, CUNY

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Should I Vote For Corbyn? I Mean Labour? By William Bowles + Tariq Ali: Election Time in Britain + Tasting the Bitter Pill of History by William Bowles

Jeremy Corbyn graffiti, Camden

Image by duncan c via Flickr

Updated: June 8, 2017

by William Bowles
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Investigating Imperialism
London, England
June 7, 2017

And after all the bad things I’ve said about Corbyn (here, here and here) you would think asking the question was redundant, but is it? Should I vote for Corbyn/Labour Party or perhaps abstain? What is at stake here, aside from Corbyn’s political future (and perhaps the future of the Labour Party itself)? He is after all, almost at retirement age and thrust into a position that he never asked for in the first place. Had he been ten or twenty years younger I seriously doubt whether he would have accepted the position.

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The Differences Between the Conservatives and Labour are Defined and Stark by Graham Peebles

#juniordoctorsstrike Jeremy Corbyn

Image by Garry Knight via Flickr

by Graham Peebles
Writer, Dandelion Salad
London, England
June 1, 2017

After 20-plus years of being lost in the muddy centre ground of British politics, the Labour party now stands tall again as the party of social democracy, rooted in values of social justice, participation and unity. Under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is offering a positive message of hope at the coming UK election and presents a real alternative to the Conservatives.

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Why Would Anyone Vote Conservative in the UK Election? by Graham Peebles

Protesters

Image by James O’Hanlon via Flickr

by Graham Peebles
Writer, Dandelion Salad
London, England
May 26, 2017

Consistent with 21st century politics the announcement on 18th April of a general election by Prime Minister Theresa May was a cynical move based purely on self-interest. The ‘snap election’ to be held on 8th June contravenes the fixed parliament act of 2011, which introduced fixed term elections (every five years) for the first time.

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Strutting Fascism And Swaggering Militarism By Gaither Stewart

Fascism

Image by Henrik Ström via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
Originally posted June 12, 2008
May 20, 2017

“We work for the moral and traditional values which Socialists neglect and despise….”

–Benito Mussolini

It’s their strutting. That detestable image of the strutting that links them, the strutting and prancing Fascists and their swaggering and parading military cousins, up front for their conveniently concealed corporatist controllers. A strutting and swaggering couple they are, Fascism and the entrenched class of war. Their distorted visions of gallantry and nation come so naturally to both. The spick and span generals, employers of mercenaries and killers, chin in, chest out, and their majors and their colonels (especially the generals in the offices and the majors in the tents), thick chests covered with ribbons and medals and rows of multicolored decorations—awarded for killing. And the political Fascists! Defiant chins thrust forward, hard fists clinched, swaggering and prancing and strutting across the stages of piazzas nations and continents—in support of the killing.

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Britain’s Corbyn Bravely Makes the Case for Socialism by Finian Cunningham + Corbyn on Labour’s Defence and Foreign Policy Priorities

Jeremy Corbyn, Labour MP for Islington North, speaking outside Iraq inquiry, London, Blair inside

Image by Chris Beckett via Flickr

by Finian Cunningham
Writer, Dandelion Salad
East Africa
Crossposted from Strategic Culture Foundation
May 15, 2017

As Britons go to a general election next month, the Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn has set out its manifesto offering the electorate a clear choice for socialism.

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The Early Christian Communists by Roman A. Montero

The Disciples gather the Bread

Image by Lawrence OP via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Roman A. Montero
Libcom, May 4, 2017
May 8, 2017

The early Christian Communities practiced communism, here’s how we know.

When I wrote the book All Things in Common, The Economic Practices of the Early Christians some people suggested I drop my use of the term ”communism” from the text; their reasoning was sound: the term communism has many negative connotations. When most people hear the world “communism”, they think of one of two things: totalitarian regimes such as Stalinist Russia or Maoist China, or some far off utopia where the entire world lives without any property whatsoever or any state. The actual classical meaning of the word, the meaning that actually represents something in reality, is basically nothing more than any social-relationship or structure where the principle of “from each according to his ability to each according to his need” is the primary moral framework of the social relationship or structure. Instead of replacing the term with something else, I went through the trouble of breaking down what communism actually means and contrasting it with other principles of social-relationships like hierarchy or exchange. The reason I stuck with the term “communism” was simple: that term is simply the most fitting term for the economic practices of the early Christians that differentiated them from the larger Roman world; the more I studied the issue the more I became convinced of that.

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Salt of the Earth (1954)

Salt of the Earth

screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

LikeManyThingThings on Mar 13, 2013

Salt of the Earth (1954) is an American drama film written by Michael Wilson, directed by Herbert J. Biberman, and produced by Paul Jarrico. All had been blacklisted by the Hollywood establishment due to their alleged involvement in communist politics.

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Peter Symonds: The Danger of Nuclear War in North East Asia

armageddon

Image by Ben Salter via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

World Socialist Web Site on May 3, 2017

The threats against North Korea are part of a broader confrontation with China, which the US regards as the chief obstacle to its global hegemony.

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