A Letter to Americans about Afghanistan, from the Margins of Empire, by Kenn Orphan

Afghan-Americans hold NYC vigil to protest Kabul bombing, June 2, 2017

Image by Joe Catron via Flickr

by Kenn Orphan
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Halifax, Nova Scotia
August 31, 2021

Dear Americans,

I wanted to share some thoughts with you on Afghanistan, as it sits atop the rubble of another indifferent imperial folly with the dread of once again living under a fundamentalist authoritarian regime on the horizon. And especially on the American public’s disconnect from its own government’s culpability in spreading misery there and throughout the Global South. I wanted to talk about reflection too.

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Biden Forfeits his Afghan Victory by Defending his Deep State Advisors, by Michael Hudson

Economic Warfare

Image by Truthout.org via Flickr

by Michael Hudson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
August 22, 2021

President Biden put a popular flag-waving wrapping for America’s forced withdrawal from Afghanistan in his 4 PM speech on Monday. It was as if all this was following Biden’s own intentions, not a demonstration of the totally incompetent assurances by the CIA and State Department as recently as last Friday that the Taliban was over a month away from being able to enter Kabul. Instead of saying that the massive public support for the Taliban replacing the United States showed the incompetent hubris of U.S. intelligence agencies – which itself would have justified Biden’s agreement to complete the withdrawal with all haste – he doubled down on his defense of the Deep State and its mythology.

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Chris Hedges: The Fictitious Ideas of Empire and Western Civilization

Chris Hedges: Legacy of Empire

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Aug 18, 2021

On the show this week, Chris Hedges discusses the importance of the scholar Edward Said with Professor Hamid Dabashi. Dabashi is the professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University.

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Lies, Damn Lies, and What We’ve Been Told About Afghanistan, by David Swanson

Lies

Image by tq2cute via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy, Aug. 17, 2021
August 18, 2021

It’s far from the longest U.S. war. There was no peace before or after it. There is no after it until they end it — and bombing has always been most of what it is. It has had nothing to do with opposing terrorism. It has been a one-sided slaughter, a mass killing over two decades by a single invading army and air force dragging along token mascots from dozens of vassal states. After 20 years Afghanistan was one of the worst places to be on Earth, and the Earth as a whole was a worse place to be — the rule of law, the state of nature, the refugee crises, the spread of terrorism, the militarization of governments all worsened. Then the Taliban took over.

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Kabul has Fallen, by Kenn Orphan + U.S.-backed Afghan Government Surrenders to the Taliban

Protest against U.S military interventions and endless U.S. wars, Minneapolis, Minnesota, October 8, 2016

Image by Fibonacci Blue via Flickr

by Kenn Orphan
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Halifax, Nova Scotia
August 16, 2021

“The Taliban is not the North Vietnamese army. There’s gonna be no circumstance where you see people being lifted off the roof of a embassy of the United States from Afghanistan.” — US President Biden, July 2021

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Chris Hedges and Danny Sjursen: The Historical Myths About World War II

24th Panzer Division in Stalingrad

Image by Cassowary Colorizations via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Aug 14, 2021

On the show this week, Chris Hedges discusses the historical myths about World War II with Danny Sjursen, Retired US Army Major, author and historian.

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The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels

The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx Bookcover

Image by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad
Originally posted Oct. 28, 2017

Greatest AudioBooks on Nov 2, 2012

The Communist Manifesto was conceived as an outline of the basic beliefs of the Communist movement. The authors believed that the European Powers were universally afraid of the nascent movement, and were condemning as “communist,” people or activities that did not actually conform to what the Communists believed. This Manifesto, then, became a manual for their beliefs.

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Chris Hedges: The Fight to Free Knowledge

DC Rally Against Mass Surveillance

Image by Susan Melkisethian via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Aug 5, 2021

On the show this week, Chris Hedges discusses censorship and new digital media with Peter B. Kaufman, author and Program Manager at MIT Learning Center.

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Hiroshima Is A Lie, by David Swanson

"XX-34 BADGER" atmospheric nuclear test - April 1953

Image by The Official CTBTO Photostream via Flickr

with David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy
August 5, 2021

In 2015, Alice Sabatini was an 18-year-old contestant in the Miss Italia contest in Italy. She was asked what epoch of the past she would have liked to live in. She replied: WWII. Her explanation was that her text books go on and on about it, so she’d like to actually see it, and she wouldn’t have to fight in it, because only men did that. This led to a great deal of mockery. Did she want to be bombed or starved or sent to a concentration camp? What was she, stupid? Somebody photoshopped her into a picture with Mussolini and Hitler. Somebody made an image of a sunbather viewing troops rushing onto a beach.[i]

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Why the Ruins of a Little Village Called Lifta Still Matter, by Kenn Orphan

ליפתא | Lifta

Image by RonAlmog via Flickr

by Kenn Orphan
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Halifax, Nova Scotia
July 29, 2021

In the Middle East stand the ruins of an ancient settlement known as Lifta. Archeological digs have traced its’ origins as far back as the Iron Age. It contains the remains of a court-yard home from the Crusader period at its centre and the ruins of several other beautiful homes, and once housed a vibrant and culturally rich community.

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Congress-Pentagon Flap Over Critical Race Theory: A Job for Critical War Theory, by David Swanson

No more war

Image by duncan c via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy, July 22, 2021
July 25, 2021

That the United States has always been so deeply afflicted with structural and cultural racism that it sometimes goes unnoticed and needs to be addressed is hardly disputable. Who is anybody kidding? Have you seen U.S. history? Have you seen the United States?

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Changes In Consciousness and Belief Systems Don’t Need Decades, Much Less Centuries, To Change, by Pete Dolack

One solution, revolution..

Image by Giorgia Colletti via Flickr

by Pete Dolack
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Systemic Disorder, July 21, 2021
July 22, 2021

A crucial argument for the incessantly promoted idea that capitalism will be with us for a long time to come is the idea of inertia in human understanding. Ideas are stubbornly persistent and can only be changed over long periods of time. Slow evolutionary change is the best we can hope for, and the prospects even for that are uncertain and fragile.

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Michael Parenti: When you had the Crisis of Capitalism, Fascism is an Attempt at a Final Solution to the Class Struggle

Fascism

Image by Henrik Ström via Flickr

with Michael Parenti
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Previously posted October 5, 2018
July 20, 2021

Our Hidden History on Oct 11, 2017

Michael Parenti interviewed by Dave Emory on the synergies between fascism and capitalism. [Interview in 1993]

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Haiti: From Neo-Colonialism to Neoliberal Brutality, by Yanis Iqbal + Caleb Maupin: Moise Killed: What is Really Happening in Haiti?

A Preemptive Counter-Revolution in Haiti

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
Watch the videos below

by Yanis Iqbal
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Aligarh, India
July 12, 2021

The 1697 Treaty of Ryswick legalized French control over the western third of the island of Hispaniola – a Spanish asset – under the name of Saint-Domingue. The colony proved to be a valuable spigot of wealth. In 1789, Saint-Domingue supplied two-thirds of the overseas trade of France and was the greatest individual market for the European slave trade. It was a greater source of income for its owners than the whole of Britain’s thirteen North American colonies combined. The labour of half-a-million slaves propped up the dazzling opulence of the French commercial bourgeoisie, and formed the hidden foundations of cities like Bordeaux, Nantes, and Marseille. In August 1791, after two years of the French Revolution and its ripple effects in Saint-Domingue, the slaves revolted.

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