Plutocracy III: Class War (must-see)

Plutocracy III: Class War

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

Scott N June 2017

Income inequality has become a big issue in the modern day political spectrum. While these economic and class divides seem more pronounced than ever before, this documentary film Plutocracy: Political Repression in the USA reveals the main reasons of these struggles pre-date the beginnings of the industrialized labor force.

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When The Revolution Comes by Gaither Stewart

LC-DIG-nclc-01342 Girl Warping Machine, Loray Mill, Gastonia, N.C.

Image by Children’s Bureau Centennial via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
Previously published August 8, 2011
June 22, 2017

The Historical Gastonia Textile Mill Strikes Are Not Forgotten

When in the early part of this millennium I was writing a rather surrealistic novel, ASHEVILLE, about the town in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Western North Carolina where I started out my life, I ran into the story of the Asheville-based self-professed Communist writer, Olive Tilford Dargan, of whom I had never heard before. Visiting then her gravesite in the little known Green Hills Cemetery in West Asheville and researching her and her activities I fell into a gossamer review of early 19th century labor struggles in the good old U.S. South.

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Abby Martin: The Roots of the Philippines Trafficking Epidemic, Part 2

Abby Martin: The Roots of the Philippines Trafficking Epidemic, Part 2

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Warning

This video may contain images depicting the reality and horror of war/violence and should only be viewed by a mature audience.

Dandelion Salad

with Abby Martin

teleSUR English on Jun 20, 2017

In this sequel to The Empire Files’ report on trafficked Filipina domestic workers, Damayan’s Linda Oalican provides a deeper context to the epidemic of human trafficking by guiding us through the history of colonialism, resistance and US domination of the islands.

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Today’s Students: From Debt Peons To Wage Slaves by Michael Hudson

Slaves to Money, Solidarity (9 of 25)

Image by Glenn Halog via Flickr

by Michael Hudson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Michael Hudson, May 31, 2017
June 3, 2017

Students usually don’t think of themselves as a class. They seem “pre-class,” because they have not yet entered the labor force. They can only hope to become part of the middle class after they graduate. And that means becoming a wage earner – what impolitely is called the working class.

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Michael Parenti: The 1% Pathology and the Myth of Capitalism

Pensions-demo-_8195a-sm

Image by Julian Stallabrass via Flickr

with Michael Parenti
Writer, Dandelion Salad
originally published October 28, 2012
May 23, 2017

freespeechtv on May 16, 2013

“A man who steals a goose from the commons is punished, while a man who steals the commons itself is rewarded.”–unknown

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Chris Hedges: The Humanity of the Marginalized

Chris Hedges: The Humanity of the Marginalized

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on May 21, 2017

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges is joined by Russell Banks, author of Cloudsplitter, The Sweet Hereafter and Lost Memory of Skin. In his books, screenplays and short stories, Banks uncovers the humanity of the marginalized. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil explores deindustrialization in the US.

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Grand Theft Workers’ Wages by Steve Leigh

Fast Food Strikes, NYC, July 2013

Image by Annette Bernhardt via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Steve Leigh
Socialist Worker
May 18, 2017

A NEW report by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) lays out in clear and horrifying detail the scale and spread of wage theft in the U.S.

The report focuses on workers who are cheated out of the already abysmally low minimum wage. Over the last 40 years, real wages have stagnated for most workers, and the situation of low-wage workers is even worse. The current federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour is, after adjusting for inflation, 25 percent lower than it was 50 years ago. It doesn’t adequately support a single person, even those who get full-time hours, much less families.

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If China Can Fund Infrastructure With Its Own Credit, So Can We by Ellen Brown

roads and railways series #2

Image by woodleywonderworks via Flickr

by Ellen Brown
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Web of Debt Blog
May 17, 2017

May 15th-19th has been designated “National Infrastructure Week” by the US Chambers of Commerce, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), and over 150 affiliates. Their message: “It’s time to rebuild.” Ever since ASCE began issuing its “National Infrastructure Report Card” in 1998, the nation has gotten a dismal grade of D or D+. In the meantime, the estimated cost of fixing its infrastructure has gone up from $1.3 trillion to $4.6 trillion.

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Abby Martin: Buying a Slave – The Hidden World of US-Philippines Trafficking, Part 1

Abby Martin: Buying a Slave – The Hidden World of US-Philippines Trafficking

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Abby Martin

teleSUR English on May 16, 2017

Human trafficking is a hidden industry that brings in $150 billion in illegal profits every year. In the United States, tens of thousands are trafficked annually—the biggest clients being major hotel chains and foreign diplomats.

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Salt of the Earth (1954)

Salt of the Earth

screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

LikeManyThingThings on Mar 13, 2013

Salt of the Earth (1954) is an American drama film written by Michael Wilson, directed by Herbert J. Biberman, and produced by Paul Jarrico. All had been blacklisted by the Hollywood establishment due to their alleged involvement in communist politics.

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Michael Hudson: The Capitalist Way: Cheat, Lie and Steal

Occupy Wall St Sept 27, 2011

Image by Zach D Roberts via Flickr

with Michael Hudson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Michael Hudson
May 4, 2017

The Laura Flanders Show on Mar 28, 2017

We’re living in a time of economic babble, where politicians and economists throw out words like “reform,” “privatize,” and “austerity” to prop up corrupt capitalist opportunists. So says our guest this week, economist Michael Hudson, author of J is for Junk Economics.

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The Brief Origins of May Day by Eric Chase

Occupy May Day 2012

Image by brent granby via Flickr

Dandelion Salad
Originally published May 1, 2015

Republished with permission from IWW

by Eric Chase
IWW, 1993
May 1, 2017

Most people living in the United States know little about the International Workers’ Day of May Day. For many others there is an assumption that it is a holiday celebrated in state communist countries like Cuba or the former Soviet Union. Most Americans don’t realize that May Day has its origins here in this country and is as “American” as baseball and apple pie, and stemmed from the pre-Christian holiday of Beltane, a celebration of rebirth and fertility.

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Imagine: Living in a Socialist USA

Occupy May Day 2012

Image by brent granby via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

originally posted Feb. 11, 2014

Joe Friendly on May 30, 2014

Editors Frances Goldin, Debby Smith, and Michael Steven Smith, join with 2 of the many contributing authors, Clifford D. Conner and Mat Callahan to discuss their book, Imagine Living In A Socialist USA, how it got published, how it has been received, and wondering how socialism might happen in the USA and what it would look like, for example how it would impact the arts and sciences. May 29, 2014 at Alwan For The Arts. video: Joe Friendly.

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Capitalism: The Systematic Poverty and Exploitation of Human Beings by Finian Cunningham

capitalism

Image by Mary Crandall via Flickr

by Finian Cunningham
Writer, Dandelion Salad
East Africa
Originally posted April 26, 2014
April 29, 2017

Workers in Western countries are now paid so badly that businesses are reportedly finding it profitable to return from China – having relocated to Asia in the first place to exploit cheap labor there.

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A Basic Income Is Less Than Meets The Eye by Pete Dolack

Capitalism isn't working

Image by Cary Bass-Deschenes via Flickr

by Pete Dolack
Guest Writer, Dandelion Salad
Systemic Disorder, December 1, 2016
April 24, 2017

A basic income — the concept of everybody getting a regular check from the government regardless of circumstance — is one of those ideas that sound wonderful on the surface but proves to be much less so once we examine the details.

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