All Governments Lie–Film Review

No allegiance to war, torture and lies

Image by Matthew Bradley via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

teleSUR English on Feb 8, 2017

In this film review of the documentary “All Governments Lie”, we hear from Director, Fred Peabody, and Producer, Peter Raymont, about how the mainstream corporate media are not holding governments accountable in the way that they should, and looks at the independent, investigative journalists who are.

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Chris Hedges: The Hidden Tragedy of the Vietnam War

My Lai Memorial Site - Vietnam - Diorama of Massacre

Image by Adam Jones via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Jan 2, 2017

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges discusses the hidden tragedy of the Vietnam War with author of “Kill Anything that Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam”. Nick Turse uncovered documents that revealed systematic violence against civilians extending beyond the massacre at My Lai. They look back at Vietnam to understand what we are doing in Iraq and Afghanistan. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil looks at the civilian cost that accompanied our defeat in Vietnam.

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Animals to Humans—Listen, Learn and Respect! by Ralph Nader + Nader: Elections, Eruptions and Animal Fables

Hello Fox Squirrel

Image by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Ralph Nader
The Nader Page
November 23, 2016

I have long wondered what the animal kingdom – mammals, reptiles, birds, fish and insects – would want to tell us humans if we and the animals had a common language?

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Michael Moore Owes Me $4.99 by David Swanson

Hillary Clinton painted portrait _DDC9374

Image by thierry ehrmann via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy
October 28, 2016

Michael Moore has made some terrific movies in the past, and Where to Invade Next may be the best of them, but I expected Trumpland to be (1) about Trump, (2) funny, (3) honest, (4) at least relatively free of jokes glorifying mass murder. I was wrong on all counts and would like my $4.99 back, Michael.

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The U.S. National Bird Is Now a Killer Drone by David Swanson

Death from Above / Drones

Image by AK Rockefeller via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy
October 27, 2016

Officially, of course, the national bird of the United States is that half-a-peace-sign that Philadelphia sports fans like to hold up at opposing teams. But unofficially, the film National Bird has it right: the national bird is a killer drone.

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The Final Theory of Everything, An In-depth Interview with the Author by Roland Michel Tremblay

Final_Theory_Book_Cover
by Roland Michel Tremblay
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Marginal
October 8, 2016

In 2002 Mark McCutcheon published the first edition of his book The Final Theory at Universal Publishers. It was an instant success on the Amazon website, however it also created some controversy. It presented to the world a new Theory of Everything that worked out of the box, to replace Newton’s Law of Universal Gravitation, Einstein’s Theories of Relativity and Quantum Mechanics.

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Inside the Nefarious and Unethical Worlds of High Finance, Intelligence and MIC by Guadamour

suited-for-war-book-2
Note: at the publisher’s request this review has been revised

by Guadamour
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published, June 13, 2016
Revised version, October 5, 2016

Science fiction deals with imaginative concepts such as futuristic science and technology. Many people are aficionados of science fiction, but what puts many off are when it goes into space/time travel and creates extraterrestrials and other phenomenon difficult for many to wrap their minds around. Science fiction has been called “The Literature of Ideas.” The genre can offer a glimpse into the future, and can be most realistic using the platform of the present and recent past to look into what is ahead. A truly classic example of that is Philip K. Dick’s novel, The Man In The High Tower, where Dick describes what it is like to live in Occupied America after losing WWII to Germany and Japan.

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An Epiphany On Wall Street, reviewed by Guadamour

epiphany_newcovertext_homepage_439x644
Note: at the publisher’s request this review has been revised

by Guadamour
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published November 24, 2013
Revised version, October 3, 2016

The success or failure of any work of fiction depends to a great extent on the writer’s ability to produce a Suspension of Disbelief in the reader. This is especially true of futurist novels, fantasy, or for lack of a better term, science fiction. The concept was first introduced by the poet and philosopher Samuel Taylor Coleridge in 1817 in his Biographia Literari. When a work overcomes the barrier of the Suspension of Disbelief, it draws the reader in and takes them into the world created by the author. Such is the case with the book An Epiphany On Wall Street (Author Networks Edition, 2012) by anonym.

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Rivera Sun’s Billionaire Buddha, reviewed by Guadamour

Rivera Sun's Billionaire Buddha Book

Image by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

by Guadamour
Writer, Dandelion Salad
June 18, 2016

Billionaire Buddha is Rivera Sun‘s third novel. In it David Grant, a self-made billionaire, goes from the pinnacle of a most unfulfilling and emotionally deprived material success to homelessness, destitution and the spiritual contentment of knowing himself (which is the embodiment of Buddhahood). Sun describes the changes Grant goes through in a clear writing style which holds the reader and compels them to turn the pages to see what happens next in this book which should be read by all Americans with their general love of money.

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Amulet, reviewed by Gaither Stewart

Marcha 40 años-27

Image by Marcos G. via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
June 17, 2016

(Rome) I am reading for the first time the work of Chilean born writer, Roberto Bolaño. His novel, Amulet, set in a phantasmagoric Mexico City that, perhaps, also because it is Latin America’s biggest city, represents the entire crushed and tortured and imprisoned and murdered Latin America while also his characters are emblematic of the suffering and decimation of much of the best of the Latin American youth. Perhaps the author chose to highlight Mexico City, not only because of the massacre of Mexican students there in 1968, but also because he moved there as a teenager and lived there many years before moving to Spain and Barcelona where he died at 50.

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Review of Suited For War by Guadamour

suited-for-war-book-2

Note: Here is the revised version: Inside the Nefarious and Unethical Worlds of High Finance, Intelligence and MIC by Guadamour

by Guadamour
Writer, Dandelion Salad
June 13, 2016

Science fiction deals with imaginative concepts such as futuristic science and technology. Many people are aficionados of science fiction, but what puts many off are when it goes into space/time travel and creates extraterrestrials and other phenomenon difficult for many to wrap their minds around. Science fiction has been called “The Literature of Ideas.” The genre can offer a glimpse into the future, and can be most realistic using the platform of the present and recent past to look into what is ahead. A truly classic example of that is Philip K. Dick’s novel, The Man In The High Tower, where Dick describes what it is like to live in Occupied America after losing WWII to Germany and Japan.

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Bush-Obama Powers Will Pass to Next President by David Swanson

Drone

Image by www.dronethusiast.com and AK Rockefeller via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy, May 11, 2016
May 13, 2016

Remember when coups and assassinations were secretive, when presidents were obliged to go to Congress and tell lies and ask permission for wars, when torture, spying, and lawless imprisonment were illicit, when re-writing laws with signing statements and shutting down legal cases by yelling “state secrets!” was abusive, and when the idea of a president going through a list of men, women, and children on Tuesdays to pick whom to have murdered would have been deemed an outrage?

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Jeremy Scahill and Glenn Greenwald: The Assassination Complex: Inside the Government’s Secret Drone Warfare Program

Death from Above / Drones

Image by AK Rockefeller via Flickr

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Jeremy Scahill Remembers His Longtime Friend, Father Daniel Berrigan: “The Man was a Moral Giant”

Democracy Now! on May 3, 2016

http://democracynow.org – “I may not be here if it wasn’t for Dan Berrigan,” says journalist Jeremy Scahill as we remember the legendary antiwar priest, Father Daniel Berrigan, who spent his lifetime nonviolently protesting militarism, nuclear proliferation, racism and poverty. Berrigan died Saturday in the Bronx, just short of his 95th birthday. Scahill was a college student when he first met Berrigan, and went on to become close friends with him and his brother, Philip. The conversations they had inspired him to pursue fiercely independent journalism. “This man was just a moral giant,” Scahill says, “the closest thing we have in our society to a prophet.”

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“We Need Dissent From the Dubious Thesis That Military Power Alone Can Change the Map of the World” by Gaither Stewart

Massive DC Rally And March For Gaza 65

Image by Stephen Melkisethian via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
March 16, 2016

Edward Said wrote a new preface for the twenty-fifth anniversary edition of his classic book, Orientalism, originally published in the USA by Random House in 1978. In the following pages I have quoted some of the author’s major thoughts and added my own ideas about Said’s preface written in 2003 for the last Vintage Books edition of his magnificent work.

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Robert Bly: Film Tribute to a Radical by Shepherd Bliss

Poetry Out Loud MN finals 27

Image by Nic McPhee via Flickr

by Shepherd Bliss
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Sebastopol, California
December 26, 2015

Poet Robert Bly, now 89 years old, is a radical, by which I mean he returns to the roots. Haydn Reiss has captured him in his new, moving film “Robert Bly: A Thousand Years of Joy.”

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