The Not-Radical “Socialist” From Vermont by Paul Street

Bernie Sanders - Painting

Image by DonkeyHotey via Flickr

by Paul Street
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Official Website of Paul Street, Oct. 23, 2017
Previously published at Counterpunch, Oct. 20, 2017
October 29, 2017

Time as a Democracy and Socialist Movement Issue

Working-class and pro-working-class socialists and left anarchists have long fought for shorter working hours (with no reductions in pay) for some very good radically democratic reasons. It isn’t just that workers’ everyday lives and collective marketplace and workplace bargaining power are enhanced when they are freed from the scourge of over-work and when working hours are spread more evenly across the workforce. Beyond these real and meaningful gains, rank-and-file socialists and left anarchists have long supported decent working hours so that workers can have enough time to develop tastes and build knowledge and organizations to fight for a world beyond the rule of capitalism, the profit- and accumulation-addicted system that, in Karl Marx’s famous 1848 words, “resolve[s] personal worth into exchange value” and “le[aves] no other nexus between man and man than naked self-interest, than callous ‘cash payment.’”

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From Great Wars, Come Great Consequences by Greg Maybury

by Greg Maybury
Guest Writer, Dandelion Salad
Pox Amerikana, Sept. 19, 2017
September 21, 2017

…[In] such trying games of conquest, results might never be expected to take shape quickly…Imperial stratagems are protracted affairs. The captains of world aggression measure their achievements…on a timescale whose unit is the generation. It’s within such a frame that the incubation of Nazism should be gauged: it was a long and elaborate plan to eliminate the possibility of German hegemony over the continent. And the stewards of the empire took their time.’ — Conjuring Hitler: How Britain and America Created the Third Reich, Guido Preparata (© 2006)

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George Orwell’s 1984

George Orwell's 1984

Image by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

Originally posted February 7, 2008

Warning

These videos may contain images depicting the reality and horror of war/violence and should only be viewed by a mature audience.

1984 George Orwell (1954)

Emmanuel Goldstein on Sep 26, 2013

BBC Television’s live production of George Orwell’s “1984”. Produced in 1954. Creative Commons license: Public Domain.

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Lily Pad Roll: The Last Chapter–Persian Paradigm by Gaither Stewart

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
June 25, 2017

Lily Pads is a name given to a new and more flexible type of US military base abroad, among the some 1000 US foreign military bases, covering the Earth, but for the most part surrounding Russia and China. Many are near Iran. I gave this title to Lily Pad Roll, the second volume of the Europe Trilogy (The Trojan Spy, Lily Pad Roll, Time of Exile), political novels published by Punto Press, New York. This novel was published in 2012 and is available on Amazon both in print format and Kindle book. The story develops around a young American soldier and communications genius, Elmer Redway, a forerunner of Manning, stationed at an American military base in Bulgaria who finds such astounding secrets of US military crimes that he divulges them to WikiLeaks and elsewhere. When he is discovered he deserts and begins an underground existence in Europe. He is aided by Karl Heinz, a wealthy German journalist (the book’s second major character). The two are together in Berlin when the invasion of Iran gets underway. Though my invasion of Iran is invented, it is quite plausible and could happen this way. Were I to give a title to this chapter, I would most likely call it, Persian Paradigm.

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Fragments, Chapter 17: Between Scilla and Cariddi by Gaither Stewart

another late night

Image by i k o via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
June 14, 2017

Here is a chapter from my novel in the works, Fragments. This long chapter is set in south Italy, shows preparations for an invented color revolution, Gladio, etc.

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Obama: A Hollow Man Filled With Ruling Class Ideas by Paul Street + Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama and the Limitations of Liberal Criticism

Barack Obama - Second Term Flare-Ups

Image by DonkeyHotey via Flickr

by Paul Street
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Official Website of Paul Street, June 6, 2017
June 8, 2017

A “Hollow” Man Who Was “Unwilling to Fight the Good Fight”

What on Earth motivated the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and law professor David J. Garrow to write an incredibly detailed 1078-page (1460 pages with endnotes and index included) biography of Barack Obama from conception through election to the White House? Not any great personal affinity for Obama on Garrow’s part, that’s for sure. Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama is no hagiography. On the last page of this remarkable tome, Garrow describes Obama at the end of his distinctly non-transformative and “failed presidency” as a man who had long ago had become a “vessel [that] was hollow at its core.”

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How I Lost by Hillary Clinton, reviewed by Guadamour

Hillary Clinton painted portrait _DDC9374

Image by thierry ehrmann via Flickr

by Guadamour
Writer, Dandelion Salad
June 4, 2017

“The statesmen will invent cheap lies, putting the blame upon the nation that is attacked, and every man will be glad of those conscience-soothing falsities, and will diligently study them, and refuse to examine any refutations of them; and thus he will by and by convince himself the war is just, and will thank God for the better sleep he enjoys after this process of grotesque self-deception.” — Mark Twain towards the end of 19th century

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The Early Christian Communists by Roman A. Montero

The Disciples gather the Bread

Image by Lawrence OP via Flickr

by Roman A. Montero
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Libcom, May 4, 2017
Oslo, Norway
May 8, 2017

The early Christian Communities practiced communism, here’s how we know.

When I wrote the book All Things in Common, The Economic Practices of the Early Christians some people suggested I drop my use of the term ”communism” from the text; their reasoning was sound: the term communism has many negative connotations. When most people hear the world “communism”, they think of one of two things: totalitarian regimes such as Stalinist Russia or Maoist China, or some far off utopia where the entire world lives without any property whatsoever or any state. The actual classical meaning of the word, the meaning that actually represents something in reality, is basically nothing more than any social-relationship or structure where the principle of “from each according to his ability to each according to his need” is the primary moral framework of the social relationship or structure. Instead of replacing the term with something else, I went through the trouble of breaking down what communism actually means and contrasting it with other principles of social-relationships like hierarchy or exchange. The reason I stuck with the term “communism” was simple: that term is simply the most fitting term for the economic practices of the early Christians that differentiated them from the larger Roman world; the more I studied the issue the more I became convinced of that.

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Imagine: Living in a Socialist USA

Occupy May Day 2012

Image by brent granby via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

originally posted Feb. 11, 2014

Joe Friendly on May 30, 2014

Editors Frances Goldin, Debby Smith, and Michael Steven Smith, join with 2 of the many contributing authors, Clifford D. Conner and Mat Callahan to discuss their book, Imagine Living In A Socialist USA, how it got published, how it has been received, and wondering how socialism might happen in the USA and what it would look like, for example how it would impact the arts and sciences. May 29, 2014 at Alwan For The Arts. video: Joe Friendly.

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All Governments Lie–Film Review

No allegiance to war, torture and lies

Image by Matthew Bradley via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

teleSUR English on Feb 8, 2017

In this film review of the documentary “All Governments Lie”, we hear from Director, Fred Peabody, and Producer, Peter Raymont, about how the mainstream corporate media are not holding governments accountable in the way that they should, and looks at the independent, investigative journalists who are.

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Chris Hedges: The Hidden Tragedy of the Vietnam War

My Lai Memorial Site - Vietnam - Diorama of Massacre

Image by Adam Jones via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Jan 2, 2017

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges discusses the hidden tragedy of the Vietnam War with author of “Kill Anything that Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam”. Nick Turse uncovered documents that revealed systematic violence against civilians extending beyond the massacre at My Lai. They look back at Vietnam to understand what we are doing in Iraq and Afghanistan. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil looks at the civilian cost that accompanied our defeat in Vietnam.

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Animals to Humans—Listen, Learn and Respect! by Ralph Nader + Nader: Elections, Eruptions and Animal Fables

Hello Fox Squirrel

Image by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Ralph Nader
The Nader Page
November 23, 2016

I have long wondered what the animal kingdom – mammals, reptiles, birds, fish and insects – would want to tell us humans if we and the animals had a common language?

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Michael Moore Owes Me $4.99 by David Swanson

Hillary Clinton painted portrait _DDC9374

Image by thierry ehrmann via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy
October 28, 2016

Michael Moore has made some terrific movies in the past, and Where to Invade Next may be the best of them, but I expected Trumpland to be (1) about Trump, (2) funny, (3) honest, (4) at least relatively free of jokes glorifying mass murder. I was wrong on all counts and would like my $4.99 back, Michael.

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The U.S. National Bird Is Now a Killer Drone by David Swanson

Death from Above / Drones

Image by AK Rockefeller via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy
October 27, 2016

Officially, of course, the national bird of the United States is that half-a-peace-sign that Philadelphia sports fans like to hold up at opposing teams. But unofficially, the film National Bird has it right: the national bird is a killer drone.

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