Chris Hedges: American Prophets of Social Justice

Chris Hedges: American Prophets of Social Justice

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Previously published April 1, 2017

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Apr 1, 2017

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges is joined by Professor Albert Raboteau, author of American Prophets: Seven Religious Radicals and Their Struggle for Social and Political Justice. They discuss the theological and ethical motivations of prophetic figures and their importance in an age of radical evil. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil looks at the legacy of Dorothy Day who established the Catholic Worker Movement.

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Chris Hedges: Aftermath From The Loss of Thousands of Union Jobs

Chris Hedges: Aftermath From The Loss of Thousands of Union Jobs

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Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Aug 19, 2017

In a special edition of On Contact, Chris Hedges travels to the former auto manufacturing town of Anderson, Indiana to explore how a community and its workforce are recovering after the loss of thousands of union jobs.

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Chris Hedges: Prophets of Social Justice

Chris Hedges--Prophets of Social Justice

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Apr 1, 2017

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges is joined by Professor Albert Raboteau, author of “American Prophets: Seven Religious Radicals and Their Struggle for Social and Political Justice”. They discuss the theological and ethical motivations of prophetic figures and their importance in an age of radical evil. RT Correspondent Anya Parampil looks at the legacy of Dorothy Day who established the Catholic Worker Movement.

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Dorothy Day: Our Problems Stem From Our Acceptance of This Filthy, Rotten System by Richard Sahn

Dorothy Day icon by Nicholas Tsai

Image by Jim Forest via Flickr

by Richard Sahn
Guest Writer, Dandelion Salad
First published at The Contrary Perspective
Originally posted March 24, 2015
January 17, 2017

In 1933 Dorothy Day, a progressive journalist and Catholic convert, and Peter Maurin, a French peasant and philosopher, founded an anarchist-pacifist movement and newspaper they called the “Catholic Worker.” The paper was meant to be the Christian answer to the Communist Party paper, “The Daily Worker.” Not affiliated with the Catholic Church, the movement aimed to follow the Christian gospels by promoting peace—nationally and internationally—and serving the poor and homeless. It urged a culture where the scholar could be a worker and the worker a scholar. It advocated non-violent changes in the very structure of society, based on social justice and economic equality.

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Dorothy Day: Our Problems Stem From Our Acceptance of This Filthy, Rotten System by Richard Sahn

Dorothy Day icon by Nicholas Tsai

Image by Jim Forest via Flickr

by Richard Sahn
Guest Writer, Dandelion Salad
First published at The Contrary Perspective
March 24, 2015

In 1933 Dorothy Day, a progressive journalist and Catholic convert, and Peter Maurin, a French peasant and philosopher, founded an anarchist-pacifist movement and newspaper they called the “Catholic Worker.” The paper was meant to be the Christian answer to the Communist Party paper, “The Daily Worker.” Not affiliated with the Catholic Church, the movement aimed to follow the Christian gospels by promoting peace—nationally and internationally—and serving the poor and homeless. It urged a culture where the scholar could be a worker and the worker a scholar. It advocated non-violent changes in the very structure of society, based on social justice and economic equality.

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Profiting From Human Misery by Chris Hedges

by Chris Hedges
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Truthdig
February 18, 2013 Continue reading

Sainthood cause for Dorothy Day + Who is Dorothy Day? + Dorothy Day’s unpopular stance

Dorothy Day icon by Nicholas Tsai

Image by jimforest via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

CatholicNewsService· Dec 12, 2012

Part I in a series examining the sainthood cause of Dorothy Day, an American activist and founder of the Catholic Worker movement. This segment examines recent developments in the canonization process.

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Dorothy Day: Change begins with oneself + Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement

Dandelion Salad

Dorothy Day: journalist, Catholic activist, non-violent anarchist, Wobblie, succor to the poor of inner cities across America. Day willingly lived the fertile ground of voluntary poverty as a site of Love–the love she held for her God as well as the love (caritas) she expressed for her fellow man. … Read More

via Dandelion Salad

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Dorothy Day: Change begins with oneself (no longer available) + Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

Who Would Jesus Bomb?
photo from St Francis House,
Catholic Workers

“It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness.” — Chinese proverb

Channel removed videos.
January 04, 2010

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Our Brothers, the Jews by Dorothy Day (1933)

Dandelion Salad

by Dorothy Day
America Magazine
Nov. 9, 2009

A lost manuscript, a continued call for solidarity

Unlike any other Catholic writer at the time, Dorothy Day saw Adolf Hitler’s emerging policy toward the Jews as a moral problem for Catholics. She saw this while Hitler was still only the chancellor in a multiparty cabinet—two years before he combined the office of chancellor and president to become Führer and almost four years before Germany adopted the Nuremburg Laws that stripped German Jews of their citizenship and human rights. Day’s views are expressed in this previously unknown essay, which lay undetected in a correspondence file in the Dorothy Day-Catholic Worker Collection at Marquette University.

[…]

A Jew came into the office of The Catholic Worker the other day and sat around and read for a while. He nosed through Cahill’s Christian State and condemned it for its anti-Semitism. Then he looked at a missal for a while and hummed through some of the Gregorian plain chant.

[…]

via America Magazine – Our Brothers, the Jews