Sleeping Through the Coup by Philip A. Farruggio

Day 16 Occupy Wall Street October 2 2011 Shankbone 2

Image by david_shankbone via Flickr

by Philip A. Farruggio
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
June 20, 2012

“The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.” — Milan Kundera

Let’s face it, most of our fellow Americans are just that: Forgetting. How many out there have been narcotized by this newest installment of the infamous Presidential Horserace? In 2008 we had the rallying cry of ‘Hope and Change‘ from the 8 repressive years of the Bush gang. Military spending was at an all time high up to that point. We had false flag invasions and occupations of two sovereign nations. Continue reading

Superpower (2008; must-see)

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Help End the Wars!

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Note: replaced video Dec. 30, 2011

from Superpower (2008; trailer) Continue reading

Chalmers Johnson: The Sorrows of Empire (2004) + Chalmers Johnson, 1931-2010, on the Last Days of the American Republic

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

Sympathies and condolences to the family and friends of Chalmers Johnson.

Cover of

Cover via Amazon

talkingsticktv | November 22, 2010

Interview with Chalmers Johnson author of The Sorrows of Empire: Militarism, Secrecy, and the End of the Republic given February 12, 2004 in Seattle.

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Bill Moyers Journal: Matt Taibbi and Robert Kuttner on Healthcare Reform

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Dandelion Salad

Bill Moyers Journal
December 18, 2009

Amidst fading hopes for real reform on issues ranging from high finance to health care, economist Robert Kuttner and journalist Matt Taibbi join Bill Moyers to discuss Wall Street’s power over the federal government.

via Bill Moyers Journal . Watch & Listen | PBS

***

Bill Moyers rebroadcast the first segment of this post:
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Three Good Reasons To Liquidate Our Empire By Chalmers Johnson

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Dandelion Salad

By Chalmers Johnson
TomDispatch (Tom Engelhardt)
July 30, 2009

And Ten Steps to Take to Do So

However ambitious President Barack Obama’s domestic plans, one unacknowledged issue has the potential to destroy any reform efforts he might launch. Think of it as the 800-pound gorilla in the American living room: our longstanding reliance on imperialism and militarism in our relations with other countries and the vast, potentially ruinous global empire of bases that goes with it. The failure to begin to deal with our bloated military establishment and the profligate use of it in missions for which it is hopelessly inappropriate will, sooner rather than later, condemn the United States to a devastating trio of consequences: imperial overstretch, perpetual war, and insolvency, leading to a likely collapse similar to that of the former Soviet Union.

According to the 2008 official Pentagon inventory of our military bases around the world, our empire consists of 865 facilities in more than 40 countries and overseas U.S. territories. We deploy over 190,000 troops in 46 countries and territories. In just one such country, Japan, at the end of March 2008, we still had 99,295 people connected to U.S. military forces living and working there — 49,364 members of our armed services, 45,753 dependent family members, and 4,178 civilian employees. Some 13,975 of these were crowded into the small island of Okinawa, the largest concentration of foreign troops anywhere in Japan.

[…]

via Tomgram: Chalmers Johnson, Dismantling the Empire

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Chalmers Johnson on the Cost of Empire

Chalmers Johnson on the Cost of Empire

Dandelion Salad

By Chalmers Johnson
Truthdig
May 14, 2009

In her foreword to “The Bases of Empire: The Global Struggle Against U.S. Military Posts,” an important collection of articles on United States militarism and imperialism, edited by Catherine Lutz, the prominent feminist writer Cynthia Enloe notes one of our most abject failures as a government and a democracy: “There is virtually no news coverage—no journalists’ or editors’ curiosity—about the pressures or lures at work when the U.S. government seeks to persuade officials of Romania, Aruba or Ecuador that providing U.S. military-basing access would be good for their countries.” The American public, if not the residents of the territories in question, is almost totally innocent of the huge costs involved, the crimes committed by our soldiers against women and children in the occupied territories, the environmental pollution, and the deep and abiding suspicions generated among people forced to live close to thousands of heavily armed, culturally myopic and dangerously indoctrinated American soldiers. This book is an antidote to such parochialism.

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The Looming Crisis at the Pentagon – How Taxpayers Finance Fantasy Wars, By Chalmers Johnson

Dandelion Salad

By Chalmers Johnson
TomDispatch
2.02.09

Like much of the rest of the world, Americans know that the U.S. automotive industry is in the grips of what may be a fatal decline. Unless it receives emergency financing and undergoes significant reform, it is undoubtedly headed for the graveyard in which many American industries are already buried, including those that made televisions and other consumer electronics, many types of scientific and medical equipment, machine tools, textiles, and much earth-moving equipment — and that’s to name only the most obvious candidates. They all lost their competitiveness to newly emerging economies that were able to outpace them in innovative design, price, quality, service, and fuel economy, among other things.

A similar, if far less well known, crisis exists when it comes to the military-industrial complex. That crisis has its roots in the corrupt and deceitful practices that have long characterized the high command of the Armed Forces, civilian executives of the armaments industries, and Congressional opportunists and criminals looking for pork-barrel projects, defense installations for their districts, or even bribes for votes.

[…]

via Tomgram: Chalmers Johnson, Economic Death Spiral at the Pentagon.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This blog may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes, to advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, etc. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

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The Economy Sucks and or Collapse 2

Chalmers Johnson: Last days of the American Republic? + The encirclement of Russia

Dandelion Salad

Updated: added Pt 3

TheRealNews

More at http://therealnews.com/c.ph…
Chalmers Johnson: USA must cut back on military spending and build green infrastructure or face ruin Pt2

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Chalmers Johnson: US wrong to believe it can maintain both a military and civilian economy

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TheRealNews

More at http://therealnews.com/c.ph…
Chalmers Johnson: US wrong to believe it can maintain both a military and civilian economy

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Tomgram: Chalmers Johnson, The Pentagon Bailout Fraud

Dandelion Salad

By Tom Engelhardt
TomDispatch (Tom Engelhardt)
September 28, 2008

Let’s start with the money the Bush administration has already thrown at the war in Iraq. According to the June congressional testimony of William Beach, director of the Center for Data Analysis, the war has cost $646 billion so far. The new defense budget for 2009 tacks on another $68.6 billion for Iraq and Afghanistan in the coming year. However, military expert Bill Hartung of the New America Foundation puts a conservative estimate of the costs of a single week of the Iraq War at approximately $3.5 billion (or about $180 billion a year).

In other words, the war in Iraq will cost far more in the next year than the Iraq portion of that $68.6 billion Congress is about to pony up in the defense budget, and so will be funded, as has long been true, through supplemental war bills submitted by the Bush administration (and then whatever administration follows). In other words, sometime in 2009 the direct costs of the war the Bush administration once predicted would cost perhaps $50-60 billion in total will stand at more than $800 billion, or $100 billion above the cost (if all goes well, which it won’t) of the bailout of the financial system now being proposed in Washington.

[…]

We Have the Money

If Only We Didn’t Waste It on the Defense Budget

By Chalmers Johnson

There has been much moaning, air-sucking, and outrage about the $700 billion that the U.S. government is thinking of throwing away on rich New York bankers who have been ripping us off for the past few years and then letting greed drive their businesses into a variety of ditches. In fact, we dole out similar amounts of money every year in the form of payoffs to the armed services, the military-industrial complex, and powerful senators and representatives allied with the Pentagon.

On Wednesday, September 24th, right in the middle of the fight over billions of taxpayer dollars slated to bail out Wall Street, the House of Representatives passed a $612 billion defense authorization bill for 2009 without a murmur of public protest or any meaningful press comment at all. (The New York Times gave the matter only three short paragraphs buried in a story about another appropriations measure.)

[…]

Tomgram: Chalmers Johnson, The Pentagon Bailout Fraud.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This blog may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes, to advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, etc. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

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Full text of the bailout bill (subject to revision) + Summary

China’s Bloodless Taking Over of The USA by Guadamour

Dennis Kucinich: Is this the U.S. Congress or the Board of Directors at Goldman Sachs! + Sounds Like Insider Trading To Me!

Rep Burgess: We Are Under Martial Law! As Declared By The Speaker Last Night!

The Economy Sucks and or Collapse

The Smash of Civilizations By Chalmers Johnson

Dandelion Salad

By Chalmers Johnson
August 24, 2008 8:24 pm
originally published 2005

In the months before he ordered the invasion of Iraq, George Bush and his senior officials spoke of preserving Iraq’s “patrimony” for the Iraqi people. At a time when talking about Iraqi oil was taboo, what he meant by patrimony was exactly that — Iraqi oil. In their “joint statement on Iraq’s future” of April 8, 2003, George Bush and Tony Blair declared, “We reaffirm our commitment to protect Iraq’s natural resources, as the patrimony of the people of Iraq, which should be used only for their benefit.”[1] In this they were true to their word. Among the few places American soldiers actually did guard during and in the wake of their invasion were oil fields and the Oil Ministry in Baghdad. But the real Iraqi patrimony, that invaluable human inheritance of thousands of years, was another matter. At a time when American pundits were warning of a future “clash of civilizations,” our occupation forces were letting perhaps the greatest of all human patrimonies be looted and smashed.

There have been many dispiriting sights on TV since George Bush launched his ill-starred war on Iraq — the pictures from Abu Ghraib, Fallujah laid waste, American soldiers kicking down the doors of private homes and pointing assault rifles at women and children. But few have reverberated historically like the looting of Baghdad’s museum — or been forgotten more quickly in this country.

Tomgram: Chalmers Johnson, Outlaw Administration.

America’s Unwelcome Advances By Chalmers Johnson

Dandelion Salad

By Chalmers Johnson
Mother Jones
August 22, 2008

The Pentagon’s foreign overtures are running into a world of public opposition.

Imperialism, meaning militarily stronger nations dominating and exploiting weaker ones, has been a prominent feature of the international system for several centuries, but it may be coming to an end. Overwhelming majorities in numerous countries now condemn it—with the possible exception of some observers who believe it promotes “stability” and some United States politicians who still vigorously debate the pros and cons of America’s continuing military hegemony over much of the globe.

Imperialism’s current decline began in 1991 with the disintegration of the former Soviet Union and the collapse of its empire. The United States now seems to be the last of a dying species—the sole remaining multinational empire. (There are only a few vestiges of the old Dutch, English, and French empires, mostly in the form of island colonies and other enclaves in and around the Caribbean.) As the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have made clear, the United States is increasingly stressed by the demands of maintaining its empire through its own military resources. Change is in the air.

According to the Pentagon’s 2008 “Base Structure Report,” its annual unclassified inventory of the real estate it owns or leases around the world, the United States maintains 761 active military “sites” in foreign countries. (That’s the Defense Department’s preferred term, rather than “bases,” although bases are what they are.) Counting domestic military bases and those on US territories, the total is 5,429.

Mission Creep: America’s Unwelcome Advances


see

US Interventions: 1798 – Present (2005)

T(ypo)ERRORISM (video) + List of US Bombings since WWII

The Military-Industrial Complex – It’s Much Later Than You Think By Chalmers Johnson

Dandelion Salad

By Chalmers Johnson
TomDispatch (Tom Engelhardt)
July 27, 2008

Most Americans have a rough idea what the term “military-industrial complex” means when they come across it in a newspaper or hear a politician mention it. President Dwight D. Eisenhower introduced the idea to the public in his farewell address of January 17, 1961. “Our military organization today bears little relation to that known by any of my predecessors in peacetime,” he said, “or indeed by the fighting men of World War II and Korea… We have been compelled to create a permanent armaments industry of vast proportions… We must not fail to comprehend its grave implications… We must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex.”

Although Eisenhower’s reference to the military-industrial complex is, by now, well-known, his warning against its “unwarranted influence” has, I believe, largely been ignored. Since 1961, there has been too little serious study of, or discussion of, the origins of the military-industrial complex, how it has changed over time, how governmental secrecy has hidden it from oversight by members of Congress or attentive citizens, and how it degrades our Constitutional structure of checks and balances.

…continued

FAIR USE NOTICE: This blog may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes, to advance understanding of human rights, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, etc. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

Inverted Totalitarianism: A New Way of Understanding How the U.S. Is Controlled by Chalmers Johnson

Dandelion Salad

by Chalmers Johnson
Truthdig
May 15, 2008 Continue reading