Is Myanmar at a Crossroads? by Brian McAfee

by Brian McAfee
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
April 24, 2011

Chevron & Parker Selfridge "We Agree" Ad

Image by jonathan mcintosh via Flickr

So far 2011 is proving to be an eventful year for Myanmar, formerly known as and still generally called Burma. Despite the slight easing of restraints put on Aung San Suu Kyi, the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that struck Shan State in northeast Burma on March 24, which the junta controlled media says killed 75 people but aid agencies believe killed over 150, leads to widespread distrust of the country’s rulers and their version of reality. Now the U.S. is sending a new envoy to Myanmar, Derek Mitchell, a Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific affairs. It is an open question: What will be his role in Burma?

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Economic Hitman John Perkins, interviewed by Cindy Sheehan

by Cindy Sheehan
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Cindy Sheehan’s Soapbox Blog
Cindy Sheehan’s Soapbox
April 10, 2011

(SOAPBOX #94) – Cindy’s first guest is activist Karen Tostado.  Her main website is United We Strike.  She’s also developing another web site, Taxfree15.com.  She contributes many worthwhile & cogent insights […] and ideas.  Check it out!

Cindy’s next guest is former Economic Hitman John Perkins, who discusses events in Libya plus the Shamanic movement and its influence of Shamanic spirituality on the non-violent popular revolution in Latin America – and on the Robber class’ (= corporatocracy’s) profound FEAR of the emergence of a “Good Example” there (i.e., any form of social organization that doesn’t concentrate the wealth in the hands of the upper 0.1% of the population and thus all the real power in society).

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Greg Palast: Oil Dictatorships are the bigger threat to the global economy + Chevron vs. the Amazon

with Greg Palast
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
www.gregpalast.com
February 15, 2011

Chevron's Toxic Legacy in Ecuador's Amazon

Image by Rainforest Action Network via Flickr

RussiaToday | February 17, 2011

This time Max Keiser and co-host, Stacy Herbert, talk about Guanxi schemes selling fictional forests for real money, while real farmland cant find even a virtual penny. In the second half of the show, Max talks to author and documentary filmmaker, Greg Palast, about whether it is peak oil or oil dictatorships that is the bigger threat to the global economy.

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Chevron Runs from Judgment in Ecuador by Greg Palast

by Greg Palast
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
www.gregpalast.com
February 15, 2011

Chevron's Toxic Legacy in Ecuador's Amazon

Image by Rainforest Action Network via Flickr

Chevron petroleum Corporation is attempting to slither out of an $8 billion judgment rendered yesterday by a trial court in Ecuador for cancer deaths, illnesses and destruction caused by its Texaco unit.

I’ve been there, in Ecuador.

I met the victims.  They didn’t lose their shrimp boats; they lost their kids.  Emergildo Criollo, Chief of the Cofan Natives of the Amazon, told me about his three-year-old.  “He went swimming, then began vomiting blood.” Then he died.

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World’s Largest Environmental Lawsuit in Ecuador

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

Chevron's Toxic Legacy in Ecuador's Amazon

Image by Rainforest Action Network via Flickr

TheRealNews | December 21, 2010

30,000 natives fight for compensation against Texaco (now Chevron), accused of 3 decades of toxic dumping in Amazon

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The Petroleum Broadcast System Owes Us an Apology by Greg Palast + PBS’ The Spill

by Greg Palast
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
www.gregpalast.com
for Truthout/Buzzflash
27 October, 2010

Tonight, my dog Pluto and I watched the PBS ‘Frontline’ investigation of BP, “The Spill.”

PBS has uncovered a real shocker:  BP neglected safety!

Well, no shit, Sherlock!

Pluto rolled over on the rug and looked at me as if to say, Don’t we already know this?

Then PBS told us — get ready — that BP has neglected warnings about oil safety for years!That’s true.  But so has PBS.  The Petroleum Broadcast System has turned a blind eye to BP perfidy for decades.

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Crude (2009)

Dandelion Salad

Note: replaced video June 30, 2012

Chevron's Toxic Legacy in Ecuador's Amazon

Image by Rainforest Action Network via Flickr

From Wikipedia:

Crude is a 2009 American documentary film directed and produced by Joe Berlinger.[1] It follows a two year portion of an ongoing class action lawsuit against the Chevron Corporation in Ecuador.

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Greg Palast: Ecuador- The Presidential Interview (2008)

Note: the video was posted previously but without the transcript.

by Greg Palast
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
www.gregpalast.com
1 October, 2010

Ecuador news today

Ecuador’s president attacked by police.

Country’s leader trapped in hospital after assault, as government declares a one-week state of emergency.

In February 2008 Greg Palast met with Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa. They discussed the Lawsuit against Chevron, Eradicating Foreign Debt and Why He Says “Ecuador is No Longer for Sale”

Watch part of the interview. [See video below.]

GregPalastOffice

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Chevron’s “Crude” Attempt to Suppress Free Speech by Bill Moyers and Michael Winship

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

by Bill Moyers and Michael Winship
t r u t h o u t
May 15, 2010

Even as headlines and broadcast news are dominated by BP’s fire-ravaged, sunken offshore rig and the ruptured well gushing a reported 210,000 gallons of oil per day into the Gulf of Mexico, there’s another important story involving Big Oil and pollution – one that shatters not only the environment but the essential First Amendment right of journalists to tell truth and shame the devil.

(Have you read, by the way, that after the surviving, dazed and frightened workers were evacuated from that burning platform, they were met by lawyers from the drilling giant Transocean with forms to sign stating they had not been injured and had no first-hand knowledge of what had happened?! So much for the corporate soul.)

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Ecuador: The Tribes vs. Chevron-Texaco + Ecuador wants money not to drill in Amazon

Dandelion Salad

linktv
October 27, 2009

More at http://www.linktv.org/latinpulse

(Latin Pulse: October 27, 2009) Thousands of people representing Ecuador’s indigenous tribes are suing Chevron-Texaco over the pools of toxic wastewater the company left behind. Following Chevron-Texaco’s 30 years of profit from indigenous lands and resources, the tribes are seeking 27.3 billion dollars from the California-based corporation for the clean-up. We talk with Joe Berlinger about his new film on the case, Crude, and with Amazon Watch about the worst environmental disaster since Chernobyl. But Chevron-Texaco is not the only problem for the indigenous communities of Ecuador; the native population is taking to the streets, demanding a seat at the negotiating table with the government in order to contest other proposed developments on their territories.

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Rafael Correa on Global Capitalism

Dandelion Salad

Democracy Now!
June 29, 2009

Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa on Global Capitalism, Why He Won’t Renew the US Base in Manta, Chevron in the Amazon, Obama’s War in Afghanistan, and More

In a national broadcast exclusive, we speak with the President of Ecuador, Rafael Correa. He was in New York attending the United Nations Conference on the World Financial and Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Development. In a wide-ranging interview, we speak with President Correa about global capitalism, his decision not to renew the license for the US military base in Manta, the $12 billion lawsuit against Chevron brought by thousands of Amazon residents for toxic oil pollution, Ecuador’s relationship with Colombia, and his advice to President Obama: “To learn more and come to better understand the region, and that [Obama] not let himself be taken along by the power of certain media outlets that are comprised with certain ideological fundaments, that the heroes are not necessarily heroes and the villains are not necessarily villains.” [includes rush transcript–partial]

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via Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa on Global Capitalism, Why He Won’t Renew the US Base in Manta, Chevron in the Amazon, Obama’s War in Afghanistan, and More

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The Burmese Regime’s Lifeline – Chevron’s Pipeline By Amy Goodman

Dandelion Salad

By Amy Goodman
10/05/07 “ICH

The barbarous military regime depends on revenue from the nation’s gas reserves and partners such as Chevron, a detail ignored by the Bush administration.

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Burma is Nigeria, and Chevron is Both by Malcolm

Malcolm

Featured writer
Dandelion Salad

Malcolm’s Blog
Oct. 4, 2007

England has organizations established to change the oil industry…

I was doing this search about exactly when George Shultz was on the board of directors at Chevron. I found refs verifying he was, but never the years, other than before Condo Rice. That just seemed so strange. Most bios did not even mentioned he was ever there. Another story stranger than fiction is how Chevron ended up in Burma. Unocal emerges from behind the walls and under the rocks, yeh, from the company that brought you Zalmay Khalizad, that brought the Taliban to Houston on a friendship tour, the same company that bought and supported the military dics, yes, yes, Unocal was sued and lost for complicity in murder, rape, forced prostitution, and eviction of people from their land and homes in Burma.

The company of Shultz and Condo Rice, that’s right, Chevron comes along and buys them in 2005, but since the initial ‘investment’ on development had been made prior to the US clamp down on trade with Burma due to the above offenses, Chevron gets the benefits accrued in gas and oil. Now isn’t that fair, so all’s well in the Empire and G ‘global warming’ Bush can spout his indignation about the bullies of Burma without worrying about Condo’s professional future. Think Chevron will have her back?

So all’s fair in Kapitalism. We don’t need no Kolonialism. Now we Kall it ‘FREE TRADE’.

Now, just trying to write about this I’m get as hot as a stolen car with a blown radiator, but to forget about Nigeria and what Chevron is doing there does not see the problem.

For those that have read Howard Zinn, there has been a sad awakening to an old paradigm. The United States’ foreign policy has been replicating the same behavior since it’s inception. Burma is just another example, so if we are going to correct the pattern we have much work to do. Currently, Burma is not the only iron in the fire. Nigeria is not just another instance of corporate- (Chevron)/government imperialism, it is every bit as vicious as Burma and has been going on for years.

In England, the resistance to oil industry atrocities in Nigeria is well established. Unraveling the Carbon Web (http://www.carbonweb.org/) was started in May of 1997 by a collaboration of Platform and CorporateWatch. Unraveling is about the bigger vision based upon analysis of those affected by the oil industry’s impact on society and the environment. Their goal is to educate and influence the public, government and corporate leaders, “its roots lie in the Crude Operators conference – a gathering to understand and challenge the oil industry.”

In their own words:

http://www.platformlondon.org/

Platform “works across disciplines for social and ecological justice. It combines the transformatory power of art with the tangible goals of campaigning, the rigour of in-depth research with the vision to promote alternative futures.”


This site is of incredible depth, but here is a reminder if you have forgotten: “On November 10th 1995, Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight Ogoni colleagues were executed by the Nigerian state for campaigning against the devastation of the Niger Delta by oil companies, especially Shell and Chevron.”

Understanding is empowering and these sites are an education about the monster, but may be also worthy of consideration for organizing here in the United States.