Uncle Sam’s Grisly Record of Murder and Mayhem Since 1945 by Paul Street

Genocide Phnom Penh

Image by LKEM via Flickr

by Paul Street
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Official Website of Paul Street, July 30, 2017
August 1, 2017

The United States has killed, maimed, displaced, and otherwise harmed an astonishing number of people in its 241-year record of murder and mayhem – including more than 20 million killed in 37 nations since 1945.

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A U.S. Guide: 7 Steps to Kill a Revolution

A U.S. Guide: 7 Steps to Kill a Revolution

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

teleSUR English on Apr 25, 2017

The same plan used in the 1970s to overthrow Salvador Allende in Chile, is being used by the U.S. today in Venezuela against the Bolivarian Revolution. These are the steps to kill a revolution.

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Amulet, reviewed by Gaither Stewart

Marcha 40 años-27

Image by Marcos G. via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
June 17, 2016

(Rome) I am reading for the first time the work of Chilean born writer, Roberto Bolaño. His novel, Amulet, set in a phantasmagoric Mexico City that, perhaps, also because it is Latin America’s biggest city, represents the entire crushed and tortured and imprisoned and murdered Latin America while also his characters are emblematic of the suffering and decimation of much of the best of the Latin American youth. Perhaps the author chose to highlight Mexico City, not only because of the massacre of Mexican students there in 1968, but also because he moved there as a teenager and lived there many years before moving to Spain and Barcelona where he died at 50.

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Global Power Project: The Group of Thirty, Financial Crisis Kingpins by Andrew Gavin Marshall

by Andrew Gavin Marshall
Writer, Dandelion Salad
andrewgavinmarshall.com
Originally published on Occupy.com, 18 December 2013
February 25, 2014

Following parts onetwo and three of the Global Power Project’s Group of Thirty series, this fourth and final installment focuses on a few of the G30 members who have played outsized roles both in creating and managing various financial crises, providing a window on to the ideas, institutions and individuals who help steer this powerful global group.

The Assassin of Argentina

Prior to 2008, one of the most notable examples of a highly destructive financial crisis took place in Argentina which, heavily in debt, faced a large default and was brutally punished by financial markets and the speculative assault of global finance, otherwise known as “capital flight.” Continue reading

Noam Chomsky: Instead of “Illegal” Syria Threat, U.S. Should Back Chemical Weapons Ban Worldwide + Chomsky on 9/11

NO  U.S.  BOMBING  OF  SYRIA   /  Hands Off Syria  /   NO  WAR    -    Protest march  from Times Square  to  Union Square,  Manhattan  NYC   -   09/07/2013

Image by asterix611 via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Noam Chomsky

democracynow on Sep 11, 2013

www.democracynow.org – In a national address from the White House Tuesday night, President Obama announced he is delaying a plan to strike Syria while pursuing a diplomatic effort from Russia for international monitors to take over and destroy Syria’s arsenal of chemical weapons. However, Obama still threatened to use force against Syria if the plan fails. We get reaction to Obama’s speech from world-renowned political dissident and linguist, MIT Professor Emeritus Noam Chomsky.

“The Russian plan is a godsend for Obama,” Chomsky says. “It saves him from what would look like a very serious defeat. He has not been able to obtain virtually any international support, and it looked as though Congress wasn’t going to support it either, which would leave him completely out on a limb. This leaves him a way out: he can maintain the threat of force, which incidentally is a crime under international law. We should bear in mind that the core principle of the United Nations charter bars the threat or use of force. So all of this is criminal to begin with, but he’ll continue with that.”

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September 11: Forty Years Later by Carlos Torres

Dandelion Salad

Crossposted with permission from www.socialistproject.ca/bullet/

by Carlos Torres
Socialist Project
September 11, 2013

On September 11, millions of Chileans commemorate 40 years since the coup d’état in which the Palace of La Moneda in Santiago was attacked by warplanes and President Salvador Allende died fighting the conspirators. This event marked years of state terrorism and bloodshed in our country and the fortieth anniversary of the assault has been a political and emotional recollection for our friends and comrades from around the world.

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Heather Wokusch: NSA Leaks, Obama Prosecuting Under 1917 Espionage Act, the TPP, TTIP and more

Cross Border Action: The People's Round on the Trans Pacific Partnership

Image by Caelie_Frampton via Flickr

by Heather Wokusch
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Heather Wokusch
July 4, 2013

Heather Wokusch Jul 3, 2013

From the NSA leaks and revelations about widespread surveillance to massive trade agreements being negotiated out of the public eye… government secrecy is an important topic. This ‘rant’ provides background and interesting connections not found in mainstream media. Continue reading

How a Student Movement Can Become a Revolution by Andrew Gavin Marshall

by Andrew Gavin Marshall
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
http://andrewgavinmarshall.com
August 18, 2012

100 jours contre la hausse

Image by ricardoara via Flickr

And so it seems that the student strike in Quebec is slowing down and nearing an end, as the college – CEGEPs – in Quebec have voted to return to class, with roughly 10,000 students having voted to continue the strike, a far reduction from the 175,000 students that were on strike in late April and early May. The strike began in February of 2012 in opposition to a planned 75% increase in the cost of tuition. The students mobilized massive numbers, held mass protests, undertook picket lines at schools, expanded the issue into a wider social movement, and were consistently met with state violence in the form of riot police, pepper spray, tear gas, beatings with batons, being shot with rubber bullets, even being trampled by horses and driven into by police cars. The government enacted Bill 78, assaulting the rights to freely assemble and speak, and put a ‘pause’ on the school semester to end picket actions. Continue reading

Noam Chomsky: Changing Contours of Global Order + Q&A

Noam Chomsky - hinsides statssosialismen

Image by Synne Tonidas via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

on Nov 9, 2011

Professor Noam Chomsky presented a lecture ‘Changing Contours of Global Order’ a look at our drastically changing world, and the implications for domestic and world order on 4 November 2011.

This was a free public lecture and was Professor Chomsky’s only public appearance in Melbourne, Australia.

Professor Chomsky was an invited guest of Deakin University’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

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The September 11 Orgie by Michael Parenti

by Michael Parenti
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Michael Parenti Blog
www.michaelparenti.org
Sept. 12, 2011

9-11-lies

Image by Libby via Flickr

For more than a week–and extending into September 12 and probably continuing a while longer– the media have saturated the airwaves with 9/11 stories including sad tragic tales of friends of people who knew relatives who were lost or affected in some way by the terrible attacks of ten years ago. We kept hearing how we as a people and a nation “were never the same after 9/11.” (So might as well go bomb Afghanistan for ten years and destroy Iraq and now Libya.)

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The Stimulator: Puck Shit up!

Dandelion Salad

http://submedia.tv

This Week:

1. 100 Seditions!
2. Riot in my Town
3. Nuck Block

4. Chilean Urban Eco-Defense
5. For the Lulz
6. Anti-G20 Comrades

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The Psychopaths are trembling By Siv O’Neall

Note: revised version Oct. 20, 2010

By Siv O’Neall
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Axisoflogic.com
October 18, 2010

Playwright and poet Harold Pinter, in his Nobel prize acceptance speech on 7 December 2005, at the Swedish Academy in Stockholm, made an unforgettable speech, fiercely condemning the Bush/Blair attack on Iraq and, in general, U.S. arrogance and lawlessness, saying “The invasion of Iraq was a bandit act, an act of blatant state terrorism, demonstrating absolute contempt for the concept of international law”.[1]

In his speech, Pinter quotes a poem by Pablo Neruda, the Chilean leftist poet who was the Chilean consul in Madrid during the Spanish Civil War. Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez once called him “the greatest poet of the 20th century in any language.”

“…from every socket of Spain
Spain emerges
and from every dead child a rifle with eyes,
and from every crime bullets are born
which will one day find
the bull’s eye of your hearts.”

‘I’m Explaining a Few Things’[2]
– by Pablo Neruda (1936)

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Chile’s Ghosts Are Not Being Rescued by John Pilger

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

by John Pilger
t r u t h o u t
Wednesday 13 October 2010

The rescue of 33 miners in Chile is an extraordinary drama filled with pathos and heroism. It is also a media windfall for the Chilean government, whose every beneficence is recorded by a forest of cameras. One cannot fail to be impressed. However, like all great media events, it is a facade.

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The Stimulator: Slingshots and Ponies

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

stimulator | September 18, 2010

http://submedia.tv/stimulator/2010/09…

This Week:
1. LAPD murder father of 3
2. September 11 riots
3. Getting medieval on your a$$ets
4. My little exploding pony
5. Cop 15 activists found not guilty
6. Russians force government to halt forest destruction
7. Qwatsinas R.I.P.
8. Hamdulillah
9. Chile’s resistance faces the ghost of Pinochet

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The War On Democracy by John Pilger (2007; must-see)

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

In case you missed seeing this, I’m reposting.

Dandelion Salad ICH 1 hr 33 min 36 sec – Aug 22, 2007 ‘The War on Democracy’ is John Pilger’s first major film for the cinema – in a career that has produced more than 55 television documentaries. Set in Latin America and the US, it explores the historic and current relationship of Washington with countries such as Venezuela, Bolivia and Chile. “The film tells a universal story,” says Pilger, “analysing and revealing, through vivid testimony, the … Read More

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