Compare the 1912 Elections with the 2012 Elections by Ralph Nader

Panel from Diego Rivera's mural at Unity House, depicting class struggle and labor conflict in industry.  Included are representations of the Homestead and Pullman strikes.  Important figures include Daniel De Leon, Eugene Victor Debs, and William Haywood

Image by Kheel Center, Cornell University via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Ralph Nader
The Nader Page
Dec. 31, 2012

Before the electoral year of 2012 slinks into history, it is worth a comparative glance back to the electoral year of 1912 to give us some jolting perspective on how degraded our contemporary elections, voter performance and election expectations have become.

One hundred years ago, workers were marching, picketing and forming unions. Eugene Debs, the great labor leader and presidential candidate that year, spoke to outdoor labor rallies of 100,000 to 200,000 workers and their families gathered to protest low wages and working conditions.

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Eugene V. Debs: Why You Should Vote For Socialism Recited by Cindy Sheehan

by Cindy Sheehan
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Cindy Sheehan’s Soapbox Blog
Cindy Sheehan’s Soapbox
August 31, 2012

THIS IS THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF THIS SPEECH!!!

Eugene V Debs Speaks

Image by russellbannan via Flickr

Transcript

There are ninety million reasons why you should vote for Socialism in America this year and every one of them is a pulsing, breathing, human reason!

You must either vote for or against your own material interests as a wealth producer; there is no political purgatory in this nation of ours, despite the desperate efforts of so-called Progressive capitalist politicians to establish one. Continue reading

John Nichols and Phil Gasper: Return of Socialism

Dandelion Salad

Capitalism isn't working

Image by celesteh via Flickr

“In the U. S. the Democrats have become what the Republicans used to be  and the Republicans have become lunatics.”  — Phil Gasper

“There’s only one party in America today, with two wings, the conservative wing, known as Democrats, and the reactionary wing, known as Republicans.” — Gore Vidal

“If you ever hear the term “Think Tank”, run from the room. Assume A) no one is thinking and B) a tank is coming your direction.” — John Nichols

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African Americans and the struggle for socialism, 1901-1925 By Abayomi Azikiwe

Dandelion Salad

By Abayomi Azikiwe
www.workers.org
Editor, Pan-African News Wire
Feb 19, 2011

In 1901 the Socialist Party of America, after much ideological and political struggle, emerged as a coalition of various factions within the socialist movement. It had conservative, moderate and revolutionary tendencies within its ranks. Eugene V. Debs, an organizer of workers in the railroad industry, emerged as a charismatic figure, the party’s political candidate and a public spokesperson for the socialist movement.

Debs ran numerous times for presidential office and opposed wars of imperialism waged by the U.S. ruling class. He served prison terms for his outspoken opposition to war and U.S. foreign policy.

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How Debs became a socialist by Paul D’Amato (1989)

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

by Paul D’Amato
SocialistWorker.org
February 18, 2011

Debs delivering a speech in Chicago in 1912.

Image via Wikipedia

In 1920, Eugene V. Debs, ran for president on the Socialist Party ticket and received a million votes–even though he was serving a prison term for speaking out against the First World War.

In his day, Debs was well known as a great labor leader and socialist agitator. His name, and the movements that he was a part of, held a level of national attention that is difficult to imagine today. Paul D’Amato looks at the events and experiences that lead Debs to become a socialist.

BORN IN Terre Haute, Ind., in 1855, Eugene Debs’ life paralleled the massive expansion of industrial capitalism in the U.S.

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