The Pullman Strike of 1894

940626-walker-chicagoblockade-harpersweekly-color.jpgVia Wikipedia

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The Pullman Strike of 1894 Explained: US History Review

Keith Hughes on Jun 3, 2014

Join me as we take a look at a pivot strike in US History, the Pullman Strike of 1894. Perfect for inquisitive learners, students of the social studies and the cray cray on the internets.

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Chris Hedges: Aftermath From The Loss of Thousands of Union Jobs

Chris Hedges: Aftermath From The Loss of Thousands of Union Jobs

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
See video below

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with Chris Hedges

RT America on Aug 19, 2017

In a special edition of On Contact, Chris Hedges travels to the former auto manufacturing town of Anderson, Indiana to explore how a community and its workforce are recovering after the loss of thousands of union jobs.

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Abby Martin: America’s Unofficial Religion — The War On An Idea

Unions Behind Labor Day

Image by Democracy Chronicles via Flickr

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Empire Files on Oct 10, 2015

The Empire has a range of weapons to maintain its power: from its courts to its military. But it also has effective ideological weapons.

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Socialism According to Eugene V. Debs by Elizabeth Schulte

Eugene V. Debs Museum

Image by Tommy Miles via Flickr

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by Elizabeth Schulte
socialistworker.org
July 9, 2015

What did the man who Bernie Sanders today claims as his personal hero really stand for? Elizabeth Schulte tells the story of American socialism’s best-known figure.

IT’S NOT your typical presidential candidate who identifies as a socialist, but Bernie Sanders does. A poster of Eugene V. Debs, the popular Socialist Party leader of the early 20th century, hangs on his office wall as a tribute to Sanders’ self-proclaimed hero.

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African Americans and the struggle for socialism, 1901-1925 By Abayomi Azikiwe

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

By Abayomi Azikiwe
www.workers.org
Editor, Pan-African News Wire
Feb 19, 2011

In 1901 the Socialist Party of America, after much ideological and political struggle, emerged as a coalition of various factions within the socialist movement. It had conservative, moderate and revolutionary tendencies within its ranks. Eugene V. Debs, an organizer of workers in the railroad industry, emerged as a charismatic figure, the party’s political candidate and a public spokesperson for the socialist movement.

Debs ran numerous times for presidential office and opposed wars of imperialism waged by the U.S. ruling class. He served prison terms for his outspoken opposition to war and U.S. foreign policy.

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How Debs became a socialist by Paul D’Amato (1989)

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by Paul D’Amato
SocialistWorker.org
February 18, 2011

Debs delivering a speech in Chicago in 1912.

Image via Wikipedia

In 1920, Eugene V. Debs, ran for president on the Socialist Party ticket and received a million votes–even though he was serving a prison term for speaking out against the First World War.

In his day, Debs was well known as a great labor leader and socialist agitator. His name, and the movements that he was a part of, held a level of national attention that is difficult to imagine today. Paul D’Amato looks at the events and experiences that lead Debs to become a socialist.

BORN IN Terre Haute, Ind., in 1855, Eugene Debs’ life paralleled the massive expansion of industrial capitalism in the U.S.

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