The Psychopaths are trembling By Siv O’Neall

Note: revised version Oct. 20, 2010

By Siv O’Neall
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Axisoflogic.com
October 18, 2010

Playwright and poet Harold Pinter, in his Nobel prize acceptance speech on 7 December 2005, at the Swedish Academy in Stockholm, made an unforgettable speech, fiercely condemning the Bush/Blair attack on Iraq and, in general, U.S. arrogance and lawlessness, saying “The invasion of Iraq was a bandit act, an act of blatant state terrorism, demonstrating absolute contempt for the concept of international law”.[1]

In his speech, Pinter quotes a poem by Pablo Neruda, the Chilean leftist poet who was the Chilean consul in Madrid during the Spanish Civil War. Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez once called him “the greatest poet of the 20th century in any language.”

“…from every socket of Spain
Spain emerges
and from every dead child a rifle with eyes,
and from every crime bullets are born
which will one day find
the bull’s eye of your hearts.”

‘I’m Explaining a Few Things’[2]
– by Pablo Neruda (1936)

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Noam Chomsky: Want to reduce terrorism, don’t participate in it (2002) + Power and Terror (2002)

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

replaced both videos Aug. 30, 2014 and added one video Sept. 1, 2014

Excerpt

HashyBee on Sep 13, 2010

Noam Chomsky speaks to BBC’s Francine Stock at London’s St Paul’s Cathedral, Dec ’02.

Harold Pinter’s Nobel Lecture video: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/2005/pinter-lecture.html

Francine Stock: Since you first started in political activism in the sixties, do you feel that you have made a great deal of headway?

Noam Chomsky: I think the country has made a great deal of headway and I’m happy to participate in it, but it’s not traceable to individuals….If you go back to the sixties…there was no feminist movement, no Third World solidarity movements, no substantial anti-nuclear movement, no global justice movements. These are all developments of the last twenty or thirty years and they come from all over the place. For example, the solidarity movements…are quite unique – there’s never been a time when people from the aggressor country went to the victims and lived with them to try to protect them. That happened in the eighties – tens of thousands of Americans did it and they came from conservative circles. A lot of it was church based. And it came from Main Street in the United States, and now it’s all over the world.

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Noam Chomsky: Want to reduce terrorism, don’t participate in it (2002) + Nobel Lecture by Harold Pinter (2005)

Dandelion Salad

23 min 28 sec
http://www.chomsky.info

Noam Chomsky speaks to BBC’s Francine Stock at London’s St Paul’s Cathedral, Dec ’02.

Harold Pinter’s Nobel Lecture video: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/2005/pinter-lecture.html

Francine Stock: Since you first started in political activism in the sixties, do you feel that you have made a great deal of headway?

Noam Chomsky: I think the country has made a great deal of headway and I’m happy to participate in it, but it’s not traceable to individuals….If you go back to the sixties…there was no feminist movement, no Third World solidarity movements, no substantial anti-nuclear movement, no global justice movements. These are all developments of the last twenty or thirty years and they come from all over the place. For example, the solidarity movements…are quite unique – there’s never been a time when people from the aggressor country went to the victims and lived with them to try to protect them.

That happened in the eighties – tens of thousands of Americans did it and they came from conservative circles. A lot of it was church based. And it came from Main Street in the United States, and now it’s all over the world.

Continue reading