The Council of All Beings, by Rivera Sun

Enjoy the silence in the redwood forest

Image by hans-juergen via Flickr

by Rivera Sun
Writer, Dandelion Salad
October 17, 2021

Winds of Change is the third novel in the Dandelion Trilogy by Rivera Sun. It’s a wild tale of resistance and resilience, people-powered democracy movements and the race for climate justice.

Continue reading

Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published October 13, 2009
October 11, 2021

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:
Continue reading

Chris Hedges and Steven Donziger: The Anonymous Executioners of the Corporate State

Chevron's Toxic Legacy in Ecuador's Amazon

Image by Rainforest Action Network via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Oct 9, 2021

On the show Chris Hedges discusses the ongoing persecution of human right lawyer, Steven Donziger.

Continue reading

Chris Hedges: Corporate Tyranny: Chevron VS Donziger

Chevron's Toxic Legacy in Ecuador's Amazon

Image by Rainforest Action Network via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on May 29, 2021

On the show this week, Chris Hedges talks to Steven Donziger, the human rights environmental justice attorney about the grim reality when we confront the real centers of power.

Continue reading

The “Innocence” Of Early Capitalism Is Another Fantastical Myth, by Pete Dolack

by Pete Dolack
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Systemic Disorder, Apr. 7, 2021
April 8, 2021

It is not unusual for critics of United States foreign policy, whether or not they feel free to use the term “imperialism,” to express regret that a previously rational system has soured. Such sentiments are routine for liberals and hardly unknown among social democrats.

Continue reading

The Amazon Chernobyl is a Warning for Us All, by Kenn Orphan

Chevron's Toxic Legacy in Ecuador's Amazon

Image by Rainforest Action Network via Flickr

by Kenn Orphan
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Halifax, Nova Scotia
March 17, 2021

“We must answer their call. Our Mother Earth, militarized, fenced-in, poisoned, a place where basic rights are systematically violated, demands that we take action. Let us build societies that are able to coexist in a dignified way, in a way that protects life. Let us come together and remain hopeful as we defend and care for the blood of the Earth and of its spirits.” – Berta Caceres, Indigenous rights and environmental activist of the Lenca people, murdered in Honduras in 2016

Continue reading

Kenn Orphan: No Going Back to Normal

Post-Chevron 2011 AGM Press Conference

Image by TonyaHennessey via Flickr

by Kenn Orphan
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Halifax, Nova Scotia
February 3, 2021

Radio Free Sunroot on Jan 31, 2021

…and why would we want “normal” anyway?

Continue reading

Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

It’s that time of the year again. In case you missed reading this, here it is again.

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published October 13, 2009
October 12, 2020

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:
Continue reading

Chris Hedges: Challenging Corporate Power: Chevron VS Donziger

Chevron's Toxic Legacy in Ecuador's Amazon

Image by Rainforest Action Network via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Sep 5, 2020

On the show this week, Chris Hedges talks to Steven Donziger about the reach of corporate power. Donziger battled corporate oil giant, Chevron, over environmental pollution and destruction in Ecuador and won a settlement of $9.5 billion for indigenous communities. Since then Chevron has waged a campaign against Donziger to try and destroy him economically, professionally and personally. He is on trial in federal court in New York on September 9 for contempt charges, which could send him to jail for six months.

Continue reading

Indigenous People of Mexico Fight More Than Pandemic, by Yanis Iqbal

Protest banner Oaxaca, Mexico - 2015

Image by Cordelia Persen via Flickr

by Yanis Iqbal
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Aligarh, India
August 26, 2020

In Mexico, the intensity of the Covid-19 pandemic is increasing. With more than 568,600 cases and 61,450 deaths (third largest number of Covid-19 deaths), the country is staggering under the Coronavirus pandemic. While the entire country is experiencing the impact, indigenous communities represent the hardest hit demographic. Data from Coneval, the national government’s social development agency, has shown that the Covid-19 fatality rate in Mexico’s poorest 427 municipalities is 14.1. On the other hand, the fatality rate in the country’s 54 wealthiest municipalities is 8.1, “meaning that people who live in impoverished parts of the country are almost twice as likely to die if they become sick with Covid-19 than those who live in affluent areas.”

Continue reading

Chile’s Mapuche Conflict, by Yanis Iqbal

Marcha mapuche

Image by Tomás Flores Saavedra via Flickr

by Yanis Iqbal
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Aligarh, India
August 14, 2020

On 1 August, 2020, a group of civilians, in complicity with the Chilean national police force or the carabineros and right-wing hoodlums, violently attacked Mapuche community members who were on a hunger strike in front of the Municipality of Victoria, in Araucania. The attack was strategic, organized and preplanned with the occupied town halls of Ercilla and Traiguén also being attacked, Mapuche women and children being beaten and vehicles being set on fire.

Continue reading

The Garifuna in Honduras: A History of Pillage and Dispossession, by Yanis Iqbal

Garifuna Village on Chachauate

Image by fabulousfabs via Flickr

by Yanis Iqbal
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Aligarh, India
July 29, 2020

Amid the current Covid-19 pandemic, the Garifuna community of Honduras is experiencing state-sponsored violence and regulated repression. On July 18, 2020, heavily armed personnel of the Police Investigation Department (DPI) barged into the house of Alberth Sneider Centeno, Garifuna president of the land community of El Triunfo de la Cruz, and abducted him. Later, the same armed group kidnapped Suami Aparicio Mejía García, Gerardo Mizael Rochez Cálix and Milton Joel Martínez Álvarez, members of the OFRANEH (Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras), and a fifth person, Junior Rafael Juárez Mejía. The General Confederation of Labor (CGT) has issued a statement saying “that the kidnapping of these people is motivated by the activity of the Garifuna people in defense of their ancestral lands and the rights of Afro-indigenous and indigenous people in these territories.”

Continue reading

Chris Hedges and Joe Sacco: The Plight of the Dene People

Post-Chevron 2011 AGM Press Conference

Image by TonyaHennessey via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Jul 25, 2020

On the show this week, Chris Hedges talks to comics journalist Joe Sacco about his new book, Paying the Land. In the book, Sacco travels to the frozen Canadian Northwest Territories to reveal the Dene people in conflict over the costs and benefits of the resource extraction industry and development.

Continue reading

Environmental Disaster and Health Crisis in Cerrejon, Colombia, by Yanis Iqbal

El Cerrejon (Contreras)

Image by Lee Bosher via Flickr

by Yanis Iqbal
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Aligarh, India
July 25, 2020

At Cerrejon (Colombia), the largest open-pit coal mine in Latin America owned equally by BHP (Australia), Anglo American PLC (United Kingdom) and Glencore (Switzerland), the situation of the indigenous people is progressively worsening. Cerrejon Limited has informed the workers that “all the existing shifts will be unified into a single 7-day work, for three days off.” With the enforcement of the new shifts, “workers would go from working 15 to 21 days and the mine would go from 4 to 3 shifts, leaving at least 25% of the current workforce unemployed.” The new shift pattern is likely to aggravate the health of workers as long working hours increase the number of work-related pathologies. Current work shift arrangements have already led to more than “700 pathologies associated with musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular and ear diseases, among others.” As the level of work becomes more stressful, these occupational diseases will start multiplying.

Continue reading

The Potential For An Anti-Imperialist Revolution by Rainer Shea

Islands Brygge, Copenhagen (1998) — Communist Revolution

Image by Hunter Desportes via Flickr

by Rainer Shea
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rainer Shea: Anti-Imperialist Journalist, Mar. 14, 2020
March 25, 2020

Since the beginning of colonialism, there’s existed a category of middle class people who’ve shared certain economic and social interests with the capitalist class. These interests consist of the wealth, security, and opportunities that one receives while benefiting from imperialism. And since these benefits are shared both by the property-owning class, much of the working class, and even some of the poor within the core imperialist countries, the rich have been able to keep most of the people in these countries opposed to socialist revolution.

Continue reading