Chris Hedges: In Conflict with the Natural World + What Happened to the Labor Movement?

Global Warming

Image by Woody Hibbard via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Nov 23, 2019

Chris Hedges talks to author Amitav Ghosh about the natural world and sacred forces that sustain life and the conflict when treated by the human species as an inert commodity to exploit. In his novel Gun Island, Ghosh explores how these ecosystems have turned with a vengeance on the hubris and collective lunacy of modern industrialized society.

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INVASION

INVASION

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
Watch the video below

Dandelion Salad

UnistotenCamp on Nov 1, 2019

In this era of “reconciliation”, Indigenous land is still being taken at gunpoint. INVASION is a new film about the Unist’ot’en Camp, Gidimt’en checkpoint and the larger Wet’suwet’en Nation standing up to the Canadian government and corporations who continue colonial violence against Indigenous people.

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Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

It’s that time of the year again. In case you missed reading this, here it is again.

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published October 13, 2009
October 14, 2019

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:
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Chris Hedges: The Destruction of the Amazon Rainforest

Chris Hedges: The Destruction of the Amazon Rainforest

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
Watch the video below

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Sep 21, 2019

Host Chris Hedges talks to Sonia Bone Guajajara, leader of 300 indigenous ethnic groups in Brazil, about the future of the Amazon rain forest, its people, climate change, and the competing goals of agro business, multinational corporations, and the policies of conservative Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro.

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The Fight Against Climate Change Is An Anti-Colonialist Struggle by Rainer Shea + The Amazon is Burning at a Record Rate

The Fight Against Climate Change Is An Anti-Colonialist Struggle by Rainer Shea + The Amazon is Burning at a Record Rate

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
Watch the video below

by Rainer Shea
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rainer Shea: Anti-Imperialist Journalist, Aug. 27, 2019
August 30, 2019

With this month’s burning of the Amazon as a result of the actions of the fascist Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro, the first world has gotten a glimpse of the horrors that the world’s poor and indigenous people have long been experiencing at the hands of capitalism and colonialism. Because the Amazon’s existence is crucial for preventing climate apocalypse, the world outside of the region’s indigenous community now feels threatened by the consequences of profit-motivated white supremacy.

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Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

It’s that time of the year again. In case you missed reading this, here it is again.

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published October 13, 2009
October 7, 2018

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:
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Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz: Pre-Colonial Socialism and the Effects of Genocide

Edgewood

Image by Daniel Lobo via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

Previously posted Nov. 24, 2016

The Laura Flanders Show on Oct 14, 2014

Author and historian Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz joins GRITtv to discuss how the history of genocide of Native peoples effects all people of the US, even today. In Chew On This, Laura talks to Tom Goldtooth about today’s solutions to the problem – what does indigenous sustainable society look like? And the F Word with Laura Flanders.

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Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

It’s that time of the year again. In case you missed reading this, here it is again.

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published October 13, 2009
October 9, 2017

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:
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More Than A Pipeline

Standing Rock

Image by Dark Sevier via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

Robert Bridgeman on Jun 29, 2017

We are grateful, humble and proud to announce the online release of More than a pipeline. MORE THAN A PIPELINE is a story about 500 years of suppression of the First Nations and how Standing Rock is basically a next chapter in that story.

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Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz: Pre-Colonial Socialism and the Effects of Genocide

Edgewood

Image by Daniel Lobo via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

The Laura Flanders Show on Oct 14, 2014

Author and historian Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz joins GRITtv to discuss how the history of genocide of Native peoples effects all people of the US, even today. In Chew On This, Laura talks to Tom Goldtooth about today’s solutions to the problem – what does indigenous sustainable society look like? And the F Word with Laura Flanders.

Continue reading

Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

It’s that time of the year again. In case you missed reading this, here it is again.

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
October 12, 2009

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:

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John Pilger: Utopia (2013)

Survival Day #2

Image by Melbourne Streets Avant-garde via Flickr

Warning

This video may contain images depicting the reality and horror of war/violence and should only be viewed by a mature audience.

Dandelion Salad

with

from John Pilger on Vimeo

Drawing on John Pilger’s long association with the first people of his homeland Australia, Utopia (2013) is both an epic portrayal of the oldest continuous human culture, and an investigation into a suppressed colonial past and rapacious present.

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Chris Hedges: Open-pit Uranium Mining Spreading Nuclear Contaminants in Sacrifice Zones

Video - Navajo Lights on Vimeo by Leo Bar PIX IN MOTION

Image by Chris Luckhardt via Leo Bar via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

TheRealNews on Mar 1, 2016

In this episode of Days of Revolt, Chris Hedges and two Native American activists discuss the violation of land and lives of Indigenous peoples, particularly the decades of open-pit uranium mining that is responsible for spreading nuclear contaminants across the continent today.

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Happy Thanksgiving with Blood and Tears by Michael Parenti

Edgewood

Image by Daniel Lobo via Flickr

by Michael Parenti
Writer, Dandelion Salad
michaelparenti.org
November 25, 2015

An excerpt from the recent book by Michael Parenti, Profit Pathology and Other Indecencies for your Thanksgiving consideration:

The lives of indigenous peoples in North America (“Indians”)—from quality of diet and medicine to individual freedom—were superior to the pinched, unwashed, dour lives transported from Christianized England. The Europeans were far more practiced than the “Indians” in dealing with syphilis, gonorrhea, small pox, typhoid, and bubonic plague, not to mention hangings, slavery, prostitution, religious wars, witch hunts, and inquisitions. European superiority registered in a few devilishly crucial areas, specifically the technologies of firearms, armor, and oceanic transport. The Native Americans had no desire to embrace the religiously oppressive, mean-spirited, acquisitive life of the colonizers. They lived comfortably free from any ruinous impulse for massive wealth accumulation. Labeled as “savage beasts” by the invaders, they actually behaved in courteous and kindly ways—that is, until they realized what they were up against.

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Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

It’s that time of the year again. In case you missed reading this, here it is again.

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
October 12, 2009

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:

Continue reading