Travels of a New Gulliver: Chapter 2 by Joseph Natoli

by Joseph Natoli
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
August 5, 2011

Protesters at a health care reform town hall m...

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Chapter II

In which the Author and his young companion Ned arrive in the village of Trickle Downs and there find that anything is possible, words are never pawns, personal choice matters most, exclamations of “Whatever” replace jumping back, and there are no speed limits.

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Travels of a New Gulliver: Chapter 1 by Joseph Natoli

by Joseph Natoli
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
July 27, 2011

A harvest moon rising over the hills in Proven...

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Chapter I

In which the Author introduces himself and then sets out

What follows here is a very loose account of my voyages into the world of talk as found, often accidentally, often against my own will, and seldom as I hoped.

I took with me only a few presumptions, for as Lao Tzu advises, a good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving.

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Class Warfarin: Antidote, Part IV by Joseph Natoli

by Joseph Natoli
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
April 7, 2011

Workers Of The World Unite!

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In the end, this is a war first with ourselves. As long as we refuse to admit that we are not self-creating nor free to choose to be free to choose, this will be a war we cannot identify, a war without a label. And as long as both the poison and the antidote remain without labels, the wealth of the few will increase as will the distress of the many.

“In Mondragon, I saw no signs of poverty. I saw no signs of extreme wealth. I saw people looking out for each other . . . It’s a caring form of capitalism.” — Barbara Peters quoted in “Spanish Town Without Poverty,” Newswise.com/articles/view/17012

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Class Warfarin: Autopsy, Part III by Joseph Natoli

by Joseph Natoli
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
April 5, 2011

2011 02 26 - Save the American Dream Rally (Ol...

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“What’s broken is the basic bargain linking pay to production. The solution is to remake the bargain.” — Robert Reich, Aftershock

“Some of what I’ve heard coming out of Wisconsin . . . seems like more of an assault on unions.”  — President Obama

In the logistics of Class Warfarin we greedily consume the tenets of a globalized technocapitalism, accept its savagery, including a resulting plutocracy and wealth gap that expands faster than the debt. We consistently misidentify antidotes as the poison and the poison as an antidote. Ralph Nader says that we are in a tug of war but only one side is pulling. In Class Warfarin we are actually pulling on the wrong side. In Class Warfarin there is only one side that we can identify: the wealth side that we are always about to join. Of course, there is the Jerry Springer, now the Jersey Shore, side of underclass buffoons that, unlike ourselves, will never be Winners.

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Class Warfarin: Hemorrhaging, Part II by Joseph Natoli

by Joseph Natoli
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
April 3, 2011

Inflatable capitalist pig

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Like the poisoned rat, we can’t make a connection between our decline and our appetites, or, more precisely, what we’ve been fed that’s labeled ‘fair and balanced” and we’ve greedily consumed.

“The richest 1% took $7 of every $100 of America’s income in 1980. They have increased that to $20 of every $100 today. In just one generation they’ve TRIPLED their cut of the pie.” — Paul Buchheit, CommonDreams.org 12.7.2010

We need to take a closer look at the convoluted and arcane present hemorrhaging of the multitudes, especially in the light of revolutions now taking place in Tunisia and Egypt.

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Class Warfarin: Dosage, Part I by Joseph Natoli

by Joseph Natoli
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
April 2, 2011

Why Americans are not upset by the steady siphoning of wealth from the many to the very few is a question that confounds, more confounding than probing into America’s love affair with the automobile because class and conflict are words, like Lord Voldemort, that cannot be uttered. Unfortunately, we are gladly feasting on what makes this silence possible. Continue reading

Capturing the Millennial Demographic? by Joseph Natoli

by Joseph Natoli
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
March 4, 2011

“The Oscars tripped in their transition to a hipper, younger, media-mad future, attracting 12 percent fewer viewers than last year in the important 18-to-49 age bracket.” — Michael Cieply and Brooks Barnes, “Younger Audience Still Eludes the Oscars,” NY Times March 1, 2001

“European students live in societies where it becomes more difficult to collapse public life into largely private considerations. Students in these countries have access to a wider range of critical public spheres;
politics in many of these countries has not collapsed entirely into the spectacle of celebrity/commodity culture; left-oriented political parties still exist; and labor unions have more political and ideological clout than they do in the United States.”  — Henry A. Giroux, Left Behind? American Youth and the Global Fight for Democracy Truthout (www.truth-out.org)

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State of the Union: Unnamable Politics and Useful Idiots by Joseph Natoli

by Joseph Natoli
Guest Writer
Dandelion Salad
http://politicalaffairs.net January 28, 2011
February 2, 2011

Make Capitalism History

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“For decades, Egypt’s authoritarian president, Hosni Mubarak, played a clever game with his political opponents. He tolerated a tiny and toothless opposition of liberal intellectuals whose vain electoral campaigns created the façade of a democratic process.” — David D. Kirkpatrick and Michael Slackman, “Youths Upend Cairo’s Taming of Opposition,” NYTimes January 27, 2011

“The pragmatist will compromise when he has to, as Obama did with tax cuts, angering liberal Democrats but helping him with the much bigger slice of the electorate who call themselves independents.” — Timothy Egan, “The Six-Year Blueprint,”  NYTimes January 26, 2011

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