Martin Luther King, Jr.: “I Have a Dream…to Go to War?!”

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bravenewfoundation | January 15, 2011

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“The great initiative in this war is ours. The initiative to end it must be ours.”
–Martin Luther King, Jr., speaking of Vietnam.

This week the Pentagon sank to a new low: claiming that Dr. King would “understand” the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. King’s legacy is clear: he opposed war and other violence and condemned war as “an enemy of the poor.”

Help us stop the Pentagon’s lies and attempts to justify the brutal, futile war in Afghanistan. Spread the truth by sharing this video with your family and friends.

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Beyond Vietnam – A Time to Break Silence By Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. (1967) (repost)

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Dr. Martin Luther King giving his "I Have...

Image via Wikipedia

Posted previously on March 13, 2006 and again January 14, 2007 and again January 20, 2008. ~ Lo

Video and transcript

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via Dandelion Salad

Brief Thoughts About Glenn Beck’s Recent D.C. Rally by Ed Ciaccio

by Ed Ciaccio
Dandelion Salad
Featured Writer
– August 31, 2010
September 5, 2010

Dr. Martin Luther King giving his "I Have...

Image via Wikipedia

TV personality/self-assumed “messiah”/and seller of gold Glenn Beck held his D.C. rally to “Take Back America” last Saturday on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, where, in 1963 on that same date, August 28, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous “I Have A Dream” speech about the dire need for racial integration and tolerance.

The Beck crowd, in the tens of thousands, drew families from all over the U.S. They were “preached” to by Beck and Sarah Palin, among others. Palin said she spoke “not as a politician. No, as something more — something much more. I’ve been asked to speak as the mother of a soldier…Say what you want to say about me, but I raised a combat vet, and you can’t take that away from me.”

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Federal Bureau of Intimidation by Howard Zinn

by Howard Zinn
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
previously published on http://mediafilter.org

I thought it would be good to talk about the FBI because they talk about us. They don’t like to be talked about. They don’t even like the fact that you’re listening to them being talked about. They are very sensitive people. If you look into the history of the FBI and Martin Luther King-which now has become notorious in that totally notorious history of the FBI- the FBI attempted to neutralize, perhaps kill him, perhaps get him to commit suicide, certainly to destroy him as a leader of black people in the United States. And if you follow the progression of that treatment of King, it starts, not even with the Montgomery Bus Boycott; it starts when King begins to criticize the FBI. You see, then suddenly Hoover’s ears, all four of them, perk up. And he says, okay, we have to start working on King.

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Bill Moyers Journal: Bryan Stevenson and Michelle Alexander + Inequality

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Bill Moyers Journal
April 02, 2010

Bryan Stevenson and Michelle Alexander

In the months before his death, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had expanded his focus on racial justice to include reducing economic inequality. On this week’s 42nd anniversary of King’s assassination, Bill Moyers sits down with attorneys Bryan Stevenson and Michelle Alexander to discuss how far we’ve really come as a country, how poor and working class Americans have been falling behind and what America must do to fulfill Dr. King’s vision.

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Noam Chomsky on Haiti, Health Care, Civil Disobedience and more

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Marginalizing Martin: Ignoring MLK’s Still-Relevant Speech by Ed Ciaccio

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by Ed Ciaccio
Dandelion Salad
Featured Writer
January 13, 2010

“He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Mid-January means it’s time to commemorate the birthday of a true African-American peacemaker who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for actual peacemaking work.   But once again, as they do every year, our politicians, our pundits, and our corporate media will narrow down Dr. King’s life and legacy to that of strictly black-white civil rights with convenient clichés such as “slain civil rights leader” and countless, predictable references to his “I Have A Dream” speech at the 1963 March on Washington, as though that was the only important speech he ever made.  That way, they can manage to make it seem as though his development as a world, not merely U.S., thinker and leader was frozen in that summer of ’63, and that his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize was the “capping off” of his public career. And the key word in the previous sentence is “manage,” as in managing or controlling.

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Legendary CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite dies at 92 + Kucinich’s Statement

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Dandelion Salad

Sympathies and condolences to his family and friends the world over.  RIP Walter Cronkite.

By Mark Washburn
http://www.mcclatchydc.com
Charlotte Observer
July 17, 2009

He led us to Saigon, to Jonestown, to Selma, to Attica.

He escorted us to all corners of the Earth, then he showed us to the moon.

As anchorman of the “CBS Evening News,” Walter Cronkite — who died Friday at age 92 after a period of failing health, family members said — not only narrated a tumultuous era in American life, but presided over the instant that television achieved its thunderbolt potential to be the most powerful communication tool in history.

That defining moment unfolded Nov. 22, 1963, after Cronkite was drawn to the urgent, five-bell summons of the United Press International ticker in the CBS newsroom: Shots had been fired at the motorcade of President John F. Kennedy.
[…]

via Legendary CBS News anchor Walter Cronkite dies at 92 | McClatchy

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Walter Cronkite announces death of JFK

maxpowers518
March 27, 2009

Walter Cronkite announcing the death of JFK on November 22, 1963.

R.I.P. Walter Cronkite
(November 4, 1916 – July 17, 2009)
CBS News Anchor (April 16, 1962 – March 6, 1981)
A true professional in his field…he will be missed.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “Walter Cronkite announces death of JFK“, posted with vodpod

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1968 King Assassination Report (CBS News)

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Betraying the Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King by Andrew Hughes

Dandelion Salad

by Andrew Hughes
Global Research, January 18, 2009

Martin Luther King Day precedes the historic inauguration of America’s first African American President

Martin Luther King Day in 2009 precedes the dawn of the historic inauguration of America’s first African American President. This inauguration is lauded as the realization of Dr. King’s dream, a defining moment in the cultural paradigm, a tectonic shift in race relations and a beacon of real change for the plight of the poor and oppressed. Infusing the dreams and ethos of Dr. King in to the presidential persona demands a confluence of ideals and actions to truly deserve the association. To betray the dream, to profit from the sacrifice is to insult the legacy. To be worthy of the torch demands integrity.

“Somehow this madness must cease. We must stop now. I speak as a child of God and brother to the suffering poor of Vietnam.I speak for those whose land is being laid waste, whose homes are being destroyed, whose culture is being subverted. I speak for the poor in America who are paying the double price of smashed hopes at home and death and corruption in Vietnam. I speak as a citizen of the world, for the world as it stands aghast at the path we have taken. I speak as an American to the leaders of my own nation. The great initiative in this war is ours. The initiative to stop it must be ours.”

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The Legacy of Dr. King by Cindy Sheehan

Cindy Sheehan for Congress
Cindy Sheehan

by Cindy Sheehan
Dandelion Salad
featured writer
Cindy Sheehan for Congress
January 16, 2009

Have we not come to such an impasse in the modern world that we must love our enemies—or else? The chain reaction of evil—hate begetting hate, wars producing more wars—must be broken, or else we shall be plunged into the dark abyss of annihilation.  — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr


Today, I wept as my forehead was pressed against the wall of glass partitioning me and other National Civil Rights’ Museum goers from the spot where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, lie after he was shot down by an assassin’s bullet on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, TN. I wept for perhaps the greatest American civil rights’ leader, but also for the man who had begun (against the wishes of many of his colleagues) to vigorously not only speak out against the murder in Vietnam, but also strenuously against militarism, which he called in his Building the Beloved Community (which I feel is King’s opus) speech delivered at Riverside Church in NYC exactly one year before his death: one of the greatest of “evils” along with racism and poverty.

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MLK Day: Covenantal Pledge by the People

Dandelion Salad

Reposted with permission from Rabbi Arthur Waskow from the Shalom Center

From the latest email:

by Rabbi Arthur Waskow
Jan. 14, 2009

Rebirthing King, Re-Inaugurating America: A Covenantal Pledge by the American People

[This Covenantal Pledge was developed by The Tent of Abraham, Hagar, and Sarah as part of an effort to reawaken Americans to work for the vision of America set forth by Dr. Martin Luther King in his Riverside Church speech of April 4, 1967, exactly one year before his death.

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William Pepper: The Execution of Martin Luther King (2003)

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talkingsticktv

Talk by William Pepper author of “An Act of State: The Execution of Martin Luther King” and “Orders to Kill: The Truth Behind the Murder of Martin Luther King” given February 27, 2003 in Seattle.

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MLK, the legacy remembered, the message that should not be forgotten by Dennis Kucinich

Dandelion Salad

from an email:

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
the legacy remembered,
the message that should not be forgotten

by Dennis Kucinich
Jan. 21, 2008

The homage that Americans pay today to the inspiring life and lasting legacy of Dr. King is a fitting tribute to this leader who spoke so eloquently of peace, of social justice, and of equal rights under the law and under the moral covenant that established and guides this great nation. But, as we survey the grim realities of today, across this country and around the world, that rightful homage also has the somber ring of a faint and distant eulogy for a man and a message from another time.

That other time that we remember and honor was then. But, more than ever, it is also now.

In his speech at Riverside Church in New York City, on April 4, 1967, Dr. King spoke of one war that was destroying the aspirations of the people of two nations – the people of the United States and the people of Vietnam.

The Vietnam War resulted in the deaths of 4 million Vietnamese civilians in a nation of about 40 million – 10% of the total population of Vietnam. Americans lost 58,202 soldiers in that war. And in hard, cold numbers, the Vietnam War cost the United States the equivalent of $662 billion in today’s dollars.

So far, today, this no-end-in-sight war against Iraq has resulted in the deaths of more than 1 million innocent Iraqis in a nation of 25 million. Four thousand of our best and bravest have died, and nearly 29,000 have been wounded. In hard, cold numbers, the Iraq War will cost the United States more than $2 trillion.

What would Dr. King say today? What would his message be to the President, to the U.S. Congress, and to the American people? It would be, I deeply believe, the same as it was more than 30 years ago: Iraq is a war that is destroying the aspirations of the people of two nations – the people of the United States and the people of Iraq.

And, it was only two years ago that the leadership of the Democratic Party, without invoking Dr. King but aligning itself with the powerful principles that he espoused, promised an end to the abuse of political power and an end to the war that was devastating the people of two nations. And Americans, believing that promise that we would “be free at last” from the policies that morally and economically enslaved this nation and unrepentantly took control of another, elected a new Democratic leadership in the U.S. House and the U.S. Senate.

Tragically, in the two years since, nothing has changed. The policies of this President persist and prevail. The Congress yields and subjugates itself time and time again. And the powerful, righteous, and universal message of Dr. King has been forgotten.

Dr. King’s concluding remarks in his Riverside Church speech called for an end to the disintegration of humanity brought about by war: “Somehow this madness must end,” he implored.

It is not in our power to bring Dr. King back, but it is within our power to resurrect his spirit in our daily lives and in the policies of the government that we elect to represent and lead us. He demonstrated throughout his entire life that social and economic justice are achieved not through compromising what we believe, but rather, committing to what we believe – whatever the odds.

In this crucial year for the future of our nation and the future of our world, today is the day to remember Dr. King’s words, embrace his spirit, and fortify ourselves with the message that he left for us.

It is time, once again, to ask what we can do to forge ahead – in our votes, in our support, and in everything we do — to reach that place where his words, his strength, and his optimism become more than a legacy. They become the policy and mission of this nation: “Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty, I’m free at last.”


Dennis Kucinich

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see

Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence By Rev. Martin Luther King (audio; transcript)

Bill Moyers Journal: Clinton, Obama, King & Johnson + more (video)

Give the Candidates the MLK Test by Glen Ford

What you may not know about Dr. Martin Luther King + Rev. Yearwood on MLK’s dream (videos)

Martin Luther King, Jr/MLK

Kucinich-Dennis

Dennis 4 President

Bill Moyers Journal: Clinton, Obama, King & Johnston + more (video)

Dandelion Salad

PBS

A Bill Moyers essay on Martin Luther King, Jr., LBJ, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

For more go to http://www.pbs.org/moyers

h/t: After Downing Street

Bill Moyers Journal
January 19, 2008

BILL MOYERS: If William Shakespeare were around I suspect he might describe the recent flap between the Obama and Clinton camps as much ado about nothing or a tempest in a teapot. Senator Clinton was heard to say that it took a president – Lyndon Johnson – to consummate the work of Martin Luther King by passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Almost no one in the media bothered to run the whole quote. Here it is:

HILLARY CLINTON: Dr. King’s dream began to be realized when President Lyndon Johnson passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, when he was able to get through Congress something that President Kennedy was hopeful to do, the president before had not even tried, but it took a president to get it done”

BILL MOYERS: There was nothing in that quote about race. It was an historical fact, an affirmation of the obvious. But critics pounced. THE NEW YORK TIMES published a lead editorial accusing Senator Clinton of “the distasteful implication that a black man needed the help of a white man to effect change.” Suddenly we had a rhetorical inferno on our hands, with charges flying left and right, and pundits throwing gasoline on the tiniest of embers. Fortunately the furor has quieted down, and everyone’s said they’re sorry, except THE NEW YORK TIMES. But I can’t resist this footnote to the story.

continued…

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David Cay Johnston

With all the talk of change coming out of the campaigns, can we expect big money to lose its grip on Washington? Bill Moyers interviews NEW YORK TIMES investigative reporter and Pulitzer Prize-winner David Cay Johnston who says America’s system has been rigged to benefit the super-rich.

Johnston is the best-selling author of PERFECTLY LEGAL: THE COVERT CAMPAIGN TO RIG OUR TAX SYSTEM TO BENEFIT THE SUPER RICH–AND CHEAT EVERYBODY ELSE. Johnston’s latest book, FREE LUNCH: HOW THE WEALTHIEST AMERICANS ENRICH THEMSELVES AT GOVERNMENT EXPENSE AND STICK YOU WITH THE BILL, explores the power of lobbyists and wealthy donors to manipulate government policies such as regulation, taxes, and subsidies to enrich themselves at tax-payers’ expense.

transcript and video link

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Harvey J. Kaye: Time Again for Tom Paine?

Decades ago Ronald Reagan borrowed a phrase from a founding father often overlooked. He rallied his party at the Republican National Convention with these patriotic words: “We have it in our power to begin the world over again.”

Calling for a revolution, Reagan chose those words from the writings of America’s first great radical, and its first best selling writer. His name was Thomas Paine. Over two centuries ago this month, Paine’s most famous book, COMMON SENSE, sold what today would be fifty million copies. Farmers in the fields stopped to read it.

transcript and video link

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Craig Unger on the U.S. and the Saudis

As President Bush winds up what will probably be one of his final trips to the Middle East, Bill Moyers sits down with journalist Craig Unger, contributing editor of VANITY FAIR and author of the best-selling HOUSE OF BUSH, HOUSE OF SAUD and, most recently, THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF BUSH for some analysis.

“Well, this is the story essentially of the oil addict coming to the dealer and not being treated too well. Yes, there’s a lot of fine ceremony on the surface. But … I think it’s very unlikely that those oil prices will go down or that the Saudis are really in a position to help Bush fulfill his vision of reshaping the Middle East.”

On January 3, 2008, National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley announced that President George W. Bush was embarking on an eight day trip to the Middle East starting on January 8th.



transcript and video link

see

Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence By Rev. Martin Luther King (audio; transcript)

Give the Candidates the MLK Test by Glen Ford

What you may not know about Dr. Martin Luther King + Rev. Yearwood on MLK’s dream (videos)

“Free Lunch: How the Wealthiest Americans Enrich Themselves at Govt Expense (& Stick You with the Bill)” (must see video)

Martin Luther King, Jr/MLK