Abby Martin: We’ve Been Lied To, Over and Over Again

Lies

Image by Simon Law via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Abby Martin

mark jaramillo on Oct 31, 2016

The 2016 Media Freedom Summit celebrated 40 years of Project Censored. The event also brought together independent journalists, media activists, professors, students, and members of the public to discuss the links between media power and political power, and to share effective strategies for advancing social justice by promoting media freedom and critical media literacy.

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Mickey Huff: Project Censored – Censorship, Propaganda and Corporate Media

Dandelion Salad

valpo 5

Image by { d } via Flickr

on May 21, 2011

MIckey Huff, Director of Project Censored, speaks at Moe’s Books in Berkeley, CA on May 19, 2011.

Mickey discusses censorship in the media landscape, Project Censored’s history, evolution, organizational mission and their 2011 book uncovering the top 25 most censored stories from 2010.

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Dr. Peter Phillips and Mickey Huff: Censored 2011

https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

with Dr. Peter Phillips and Mickey Huff
Bonnie Faulkner
Guns and Butter
http://www.kpfa.org
Sept. 15, 2010

We discuss the new Project Censored book and some of the most censored news stories of the past year.

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Inside the Military Media Industrial Complex: Impacts on Movements for Peace and Social Justice

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https://dandelionsalad.wordpress.com/

by Peter Phillips and Mickey Huff
Global Research, December 22, 2009

Among the most important corporate media censored news stories of the past decade, one must be that over one million people have died because of the United States military invasion and occupation of Iraq.  This, of course, does not include the number of deaths from the first Gulf War nor the ensuing sanctions placed upon the country of Iraq that, combined, caused close to an additional one million Iraqi deaths. In the Iraq War, which began in March of 2003, over a million people have died violently primarily from US bombings and neighborhood patrols.  These were deaths in excess of the normal civilian death rate under the prior government.  Among US military leaders and policy elites, the issue of counting the dead was dismissed before the Iraqi invasion even began.  In an interview with reporters in late March of 2002 US General Tommy Franks stated, “You know we don’t do body counts.”[i] Fortunately, for those concerned about humanitarian costs of war and empire, others do.

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