The Early Christians and the Military by Roman A. Montero

Christians Cannot Love Their Enemies and Kill Them, Too

Image by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

by Roman A. Montero
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Oslo, Norway
May 23, 2018

In modern times it may not even seem like an issue if a Christian can or cannot serve in the military, clearly Christians today and for many centuries do, so what would the issue be? On the other hand, anyone who has honestly read the gospels must recognize that the issue of violence is at the very least problematic in Jesus’s teachings. One would simply have to point to the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:38–47) or the Sermon on the Plain (Luke 6:27–31), or his teaching on the one taking the sword dying by the sword (Matthew 26:52), to recognize that Jesus tended to reject violence.

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Roman A. Montero: Early Christian Communism

The Disciples gather the Bread

Image by Lawrence OP via Flickr

Updated: Feb. 23, 2018

by Roman A. Montero
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Oslo, Norway
February 22, 2018

I recently did an interview with Stephen Bedard on the History of Christianity podcast, also on youtube about my book All Things in Common: The Economic Practices of the Early Christians. I hope you enjoy it.

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Jesus and the Abolition of the Courts by Roman A. Montero

Final Judgment

Image by Matt via Flickr

by Roman A. Montero
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Oslo, Norway
January 28, 2018

Probably the most famous parable by Jesus is the parable of the speck in your brother’s eye as opposed to the beam in your eye. Often this parable is taken to simply be about not being a hypocrite and not being personally judgmental against other individuals. However, this saying was not only used by Jesus and the early Christians, it was also a saying within rabbinic Judaism—seeing how they used it can shed some light on what Jesus meant with it. The saying is recorded the sermon on the plain in Luke 6:41–42:
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Jesus against Hillel on Usury by Roman A. Montero

Jesus

Image by Matthias Rosenkranz via Flickr

by Roman A. Montero
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Oslo, Norway
June 15, 2017

I would argue that the best summation of Christian ethics is found in the sermon on the plain in Luke 6:20–49. What I love about the sermon on the plain is just how radical it seems on the surface, it seems almost impossible; however, when you think about what it’s saying, and think about it deeply—it makes sense. Probably my favorite example of this is found in Luke 6:34–35 (NRSV):
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The Early Christian Communists by Roman A. Montero

The Disciples gather the Bread

Image by Lawrence OP via Flickr

by Roman A. Montero
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Libcom, May 4, 2017
Oslo, Norway
May 8, 2017

The early Christian Communities practiced communism, here’s how we know.

When I wrote the book All Things in Common, The Economic Practices of the Early Christians some people suggested I drop my use of the term ”communism” from the text; their reasoning was sound: the term communism has many negative connotations. When most people hear the world “communism”, they think of one of two things: totalitarian regimes such as Stalinist Russia or Maoist China, or some far off utopia where the entire world lives without any property whatsoever or any state. The actual classical meaning of the word, the meaning that actually represents something in reality, is basically nothing more than any social-relationship or structure where the principle of “from each according to his ability to each according to his need” is the primary moral framework of the social relationship or structure. Instead of replacing the term with something else, I went through the trouble of breaking down what communism actually means and contrasting it with other principles of social-relationships like hierarchy or exchange. The reason I stuck with the term “communism” was simple: that term is simply the most fitting term for the economic practices of the early Christians that differentiated them from the larger Roman world; the more I studied the issue the more I became convinced of that.

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