Chris Hedges and David North: The Working Class Has the Most Fundamental Interest in Ending the Capitalist System

Pensions-demo-_8195a-sm

Image by Julian Stallabrass via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Jan 28, 2018

David North, Chairman of the World Socialist Web Site’s International Editorial Board, discusses the capitalist crisis in the United States.

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What Would Socialism Be Like? by Leela Yellesetty (must-read)

Occupy May Day 2012

Image by brent granby via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Leela Yellesetty
SocialistWorker.org
Originally posted July 23, 2010
December 30, 2017

Part 1: A crying need for change

At the Socialism 2010 conference in Oakland, Calif., SocialistWorker.org contributor Leela Yellesetty spoke on “What Would Socialism Be Like?” This three-part article is based on her talk. In the first part, she answers the time-worn charge that socialism wouldn’t work with this question–who can say that capitalism is working?

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Abby Martin and Brian Becker: The First Time The Red Flag Was Waved + Caleb Maupin: Why Did The Russian Revolution Happen?

Abby Martin and Brian Becker: The First Time The Red Flag Was Waved

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
Watch the video below

Dandelion Salad

with Abby Martin

teleSUR English on Nov 7, 2017

Nov. 7, 2017 marks the 100th anniversary of the seizure of power by workers and peasants in the Russian Revolution, regarded as the most world-altering event in the history of civilization.

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Socialism, Land and Banking: 2017 Compared to 1917 by Michael Hudson

Communist Revolution Islands Brygge, Copenhagen (1998)

Image by Hunter Desportes via Flickr

by Michael Hudson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Michael Hudson
October 23, 2017

An article written for the hundredth anniversary of the Russian Revolution, to be read in Beijing today.

Socialism a century ago seemed to be the wave of the future. There were various schools of socialism, but the common ideal was to guarantee support for basic needs, and for state ownership to free society from landlords, predatory banking and monopolies. In the West these hopes are now much further away than they seemed in 1917. Land and natural resources, basic infrastructure monopolies, health care and pensions have been increasingly privatized and financialized.

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Lukomorye: Poets Pave the Road to the Golden Age by Gaither Stewart

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Image by Luxus M via Flickr

by Gaither Stewart
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Rome, Italy
April 13, 2017

The recent death of the Russian poet with whom I was acquainted, Yevgheny Yevtushenko, prompted these considerations of the role of poets in social-cultural-political progress in general and in a particularly spectacular fashion in Russia. In few other countries have poets played a more significant than in Russia. Nonetheless, for centuries Russian poets have been harassed, persecuted, and punished for their songs. Dostoevsky imprisoned, Pushkin exiled, Yesenin, Mayakovsky and Tsvetaeva suicides, Mandelshtam and others perished in the cultural events of 1937. Poets seldom lead easy lives anywhere. The poet sees the ideals but he must flee from the world in order to rejoice in them and he cannot remain unaffected by the caricatures of these ideals around him.

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If This Is The Last Century Of Capitalism, What Will Replace It? by Pete Dolack

Capitalism isn't working

Image by Cary Bass-Deschenes via Flickr

by Pete Dolack
Guest Writer, Dandelion Salad
Systemic Disorder
March 9, 2017

Politely walking into pens set up by police, shaking our signs and gently dispersing will not build a movement serious about root-and-branch change. Even the more militant demonstrations, in which people — gasp! — actually take the streets in defiance of authorities, both legal and NGO, are far from sufficient.

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