When America Was “Great”… by Paul Street + Indigenous Peoples’ History is More Complicated Than a Holiday Myth

Edgewood

Image by Daniel Lobo via Flickr

by Paul Street
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Official Website of Paul Street
Originally published November 21, 2018
November 23, 2022

“Your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings… are… a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of these United States, at this very hour.” – Frederick Douglass, July 4th, 1852

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Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress, by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published October 13, 2009
October 10, 2022

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:
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A Moment Of Silence, by Emmanuel Ortiz

"There is no flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people" by Howard Zinn

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

Thom Hartmann Program on Sep 11, 2017

Thom reads a powerful poem from Emmanuel Ortiz that touches on colonialism, the war on terror, racism and the legacy of slavery.

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Chris Hedges: The Importance of Howard Zinn

Howard Zinn

Image by Truthout.org via Flickr

Dandelion Salad
August 22, 2022

Originally published Jan. 25, 2020

with Chris Hedges and Howard Zinn

The Chris Hedges YouTube Channel on Jul 6, 2022

On the show this week Chris Hedges discusses the importance of historian, Howard Zinn, for a fuller understanding of American history, with author and journalist, Ray Suarez.

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The American Nightmare, by Kenn Orphan

2022 March For Our Lives 19

Image by Stephen Melkisethian via Flickr

by Kenn Orphan
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Halifax, Nova Scotia
July 5, 2022

A father hid his young son in a dumpster as he searched for the rest of his family amid rapid gun fire…

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Chris Hedges: Travels with George: In Search of Washington and His Legacy

George Washington and Lafayette at Valley Forge, by John Ward Dunsmore, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Feb 24, 2022

On the show, Chris Hedges discusses George Washington, the fallible human being and one of the principal architects of the United States with author Nathaniel Philbrick.

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The “American Experiment” is a Savage Nightmare, by Paul Street

Trail of Tears

Image by Gary Scott via Flickr

by Paul Street
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Official Website of Paul Street, Feb. 11, 2022
February 22, 2022

“Your celebration is a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages.” — Frederick Douglass, 1850

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Chris Hedges and Russell Banks: John Brown – Abolitionist

Chris Hedges and Russell Banks: John Brown - Abolitionist

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
Watch the video below

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

Originally on RT America on Feb 17, 2022

The Chris Hedges YouTube Channel on Jun 29, 2022

On the show, Chris Hedges discusses the novel Cloudsplitter and John Brown with the author Russell Banks.

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The Language of Violence and Avoiding a Potential Reign of Terror, by Kenn Orphan

The End Of The Government Shutdown 2013

Image by Stephen Melkisethian via Flickr

by Kenn Orphan
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Halifax, Nova Scotia
January 8, 2022

On May 22, 1856, Preston Brooks, a Democrat from South Carolina, beat Charles Sumner, a Republican from Massachusetts, with a walking cane on the floor of the US Senate. Brooks was a pro-slavery lawyer with a history of violent altercations. Sumner was an outspoken and passionate abolitionist.

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When America Was “Great”… by Paul Street + Indigenous Peoples’ History is More Complicated Than a Holiday Myth

Edgewood

Image by Daniel Lobo via Flickr

by Paul Street
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Official Website of Paul Street
Originally published November 21, 2018
November 24, 2021

“Your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings… are… a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of these United States, at this very hour.” – Frederick Douglass, July 4th, 1852

Continue reading

Columbus, the Indians, and Human Progress by Howard Zinn

Christopher Columbus Glazed Tile Painting - 9

Image by Anthony Catalano via Flickr

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally published October 13, 2009
October 11, 2021

An excerpt from A People’s History of the United States.

Arawak men and women, naked, tawny, and full of wonder, emerged from their villages onto the island’s beaches and swam out to get a closer look at the strange big boat. When Columbus and his sailors came ashore, carrying swords, speaking oddly, the Arawaks ran to greet them, brought them food, water, gifts. He later wrote of this in his log:
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A 9/11 Reflection: Remember “Their” Crimes, Forget “Ours” by Paul Street

A 9/11 Reflection: Remember “Their” Crimes, Forget “Ours” by Paul Street

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

by Paul Street
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Official Website of Paul Street
September 14, 2021

So much we are supposed to forget or not know and/or care about, so little we are supposed to remember.

“We must never forget” 9/11, when “America was attacked” (when, as cannot be said without sounding “controversial,” the United States Middle East policy blew back on the nation’s financial and political capitals).

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Untold Truths About the American Revolution, by Howard Zinn

11_to have about ten men shot by their comrades

Image by Jim Surkamp via Flickr

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally posted on July 4, 2009
July 1, 2021

There are things that happen in the world that are bad, and you want to do something about them. You have a just cause. But our culture is so war prone that we immediately jump from, “This is a good cause” to “This deserves a war.”

You need to be very, very comfortable in making that jump.

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Remember to Forget the Alamo, by David Swanson

The Alamo

Image by Stuart Seeger via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy
June 21, 2021

Mexico once had a problem with a local provincial government promoting illegal immigration from the United States into Mexico in order to engage in the illegal slavery of illegally trafficked people. The locality involved was called Texas. For years, Mexico let Texas get away with its lawlessness and immorality, including not paying taxes, and including killing Mexican soldiers. Then it sent an army to lay down the law. Texans warned each other that soldiers were coming “to give liberty to our slaves, and to make slaves of ourselves” (meaning to end the actual enslavement of anyone and to require that people abide by laws and pay taxes).

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Slaves to the Constitution, by Paul Street

We, the People

Image by Brad Dougherty via Flickr

by Paul Street
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Official Website of Paul Street, May 21, 2021
May 28, 2021

Slavery lives on in U.S.-American life, crippling “our” supposed grand “democracy” in numerous ways. The massive wealth, income, and health gaps between Black and white Americans and the related persistent segregation and mass arrest and incarceration of Black Americans cannot be properly understood without reference to the two and a half centuries in which Black Americans were enslaved.

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