Chris Hedges and Noam Chomsky: Requiem for the American Dream, Part 1 + Ralph Nader Interviews Noam Chomsky

Chris Hedges and Noam Chomsky- Requiem for the American Dream

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges and Noam Chomsky

RT America on Jul 1, 2017

On this week’s episode of On Contact, Chris Hedges travels to Cambridge, Massachusetts for a conversation with America’s most important intellectual, Professor Noam Chomsky. In Part I of their conversation, Chomsky discusses the adverse effects of neoliberalism on the working class, as addressed in his book, Requiem for the American Dream: The 10 Principles of Concentration of Wealth & Power.

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Labor Day Matters by Ralph Nader

Fight for $15 on 4/15

Image byThe All-Nite Images via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Ralph Nader
The Nader Page, Sept. 4, 2015
Originally posted Sept. 5, 2015
September 5, 2016

Here’s an experiment to try this holiday weekend. Quiz your friends, family and acquaintances on the meaning of Labor Day. You might be surprised by the answers you hear. To many, the true meaning of Labor Day has been unfortunately lost―it’s merely a three-day vacation weekend, unless you work in retail, in which case it is, ironically, a day of work and “special” sales.

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Labor Day Matters by Ralph Nader

Interfaith Workers Rally to Raise the Minimum Wage

Image by uusc4all via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Ralph Nader
The Nader Page, Sept. 4, 2015
September 5, 2015

Here’s an experiment to try this holiday weekend. Quiz your friends, family and acquaintances on the meaning of Labor Day. You might be surprised by the answers you hear. To many, the true meaning of Labor Day has been unfortunately lost―it’s merely a three-day vacation weekend, unless you work in retail, in which case it is, ironically, a day of work and “special” sales.

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Boycott FedEx by Chris Hedges

by Chris Hedges
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Truthdig
February 22, 2010

Dean Henderson’s career with FedEx ended abruptly when a reckless driver plowed into his company truck and mangled his leg. His doctor will decide this week if it needs to be amputated. No longer able to drive, stripped of value in our commodity culture, he was tossed aside by the company. He became human refuse. He spends most of his days, because of the swelling and the pain, with his leg raised on a recliner in the tiny apartment in Fairfax, Va., he shares with his stepsister. He struggles without an income and medical insurance, and he fears his future.

Henderson is not alone. Workers in our corporate state earn little when they work—Henderson made $18 an hour—and they are abandoned when they can no longer contribute to corporate profits. It is the ethic of the free market. It is the cost of unfettered capitalism. And it is plunging tens of millions of discarded workers into a collective misery and rage that is beginning to manifest itself in a dangerous right-wing backlash.

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