Chris Hedges: What Do We Know About Tear Gas?

Chris Hedges: What Do We Know About Tear Gas?

Screenshot by Dandelion Salad via Flickr
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Dandelion Salad

with Chris Hedges

RT America on Dec 1, 2018

US Border Control used tear gas to try and deter asylum seekers – many of who are women and children – at the US/Mexico border last weekend. But what do we know about tear gas?

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Ban Tear Gas Entirely! by David Swanson

Chemical Agents, Occupy Oakland Move In Day (30 of 31)

Image by Glenn Halog via Flickr

by David Swanson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Let’s Try Democracy, July 3, 2018
July 14, 2018

Tear gas is among the least of the problems facing those who care about the murder and destruction of war. But it is a major element in the militarization of local policing. In fact, it is widely deemed illegal in war, but legal in non-war (although what written law actually creates that loophole is unclear).

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Bahrain Bans Protests After Cops Tear Gas and Fire On Rally

Dandelion Salad

Image by Al Jazeera English via Flickr

Oct 30, 2012 by

Bahraini authorities have banned all protest gatherings amid escalating clashes in the Gulf kingdom. It’s the most sweeping attempt so far to quash anti-regime protests that’ve been going on in the country for nearly two years. The restrictions come after the country’s police reportedly attacked anti-monarchy protesters with tear gas and rubber bullets in the capital Manama on Monday. Clashes in Bahrain occur almost daily, with around 80 people being killed since the unrest began.

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U.S. Ally Kills Children… So When Is NATO Intervening? by Finian Cunningham

Warning

The article and videos may contain text and images depicting the reality and horror of war/violence and should only be viewed by a mature audience.

by Finian Cunningham
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
25 August 2011

This is the face of state terror against civilians in the US and British-backed Gulf oil kingdom of Bahrain – the latest victim a boy shot dead by police. But there will be no call by Washington or London for a Libya-style NATO intervention to protect human rights here. No call for regime change. No call for an international crimes tribunal.

Fourteen-year-old Ali Jawad Al Shaikh died on 31 August when Saudi-backed Bahraini riot police fired a tear gas canister at the youth from close range. On the day that was supposed to be a celebratory end to Ramadan – Eid al Fitr – people across Bahrain were shocked by yet another “brutal slaughter of innocents” by the regime and the stoic silence of its Western backers. Continue reading