Today’s Students–Slavery by Debt, Part 2 by Ellen Brown

Slaves to Money, Solidarity (9 of 25)

Image by Glenn Halog via Flickr

by Ellen Brown
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Web of Debt Blog
January 5, 2018

This is the second in a two-part article on the debt burden America’s students face. Read Part 1 here.

The lending business is heavily stacked against student borrowers. Bigger players can borrow for almost nothing, and if their investments don’t work out, they can put their corporate shells through bankruptcy and walk away. Not so with students. Their loan rates are high and if they cannot pay, their debts are not normally dischargeable in bankruptcy. Rather, the debts compound and can dog them for life, compromising not only their own futures but the economy itself.

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Today’s Students–Slavery by Debt, Part 1 by Ellen Brown

Indentured Student - Cartoon

Image by DonkeyHotey via Flickr

by Ellen Brown
Writer, Dandelion Salad
The Web of Debt Blog
December 28, 2017

Higher education has been financialized, transformed from a public service into a lucrative cash cow for private investors.

The advantages of slavery by debt over “chattel” slavery – ownership of humans as a property right – were set out in an infamous document called the Hazard Circular, reportedly circulated by British banking interests among their American banking counterparts during the American Civil War. It read in part:
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The Intimately Oppressed by Howard Zinn (repost)

Ageless Beauty by Kaleb A Woman from the 1800s 'The Works' - Kids in the Hall Bistro

Image by Kaleb via Edmonton Public Schools via Flickr

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Originally posted August 14, 2011
October 24, 2017

Chapter 6 from A People’s History of the United States.

It is possible, reading standard histories, to forget half the population of the country. The explorers were men, the landholders and merchants men, the political leaders men, the military figures men. The very invisibility of women, the overlooking of women, is a sign of their submerged status.

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Today’s Students: From Debt Peons To Wage Slaves by Michael Hudson

Slaves to Money, Solidarity (9 of 25)

Image by Glenn Halog via Flickr

by Michael Hudson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Michael Hudson, May 31, 2017
June 3, 2017

Students usually don’t think of themselves as a class. They seem “pre-class,” because they have not yet entered the labor force. They can only hope to become part of the middle class after they graduate. And that means becoming a wage earner – what impolitely is called the working class.

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Jim Keady: Behind the Swoosh (Nike) (must-see)

Enjoy Capitalism

Image by Isaías Campbell via Flickr

Dandelion Salad
Originally posted Aug. 25, 2009

Thanks to Jim for allowing me to post his video here.

by Jim Keady
August 14, 2009 Continue reading

The Intimately Oppressed by Howard Zinn (repost)

Ageless Beauty by Kaleb A Woman from the 1800s 'The Works' - Kids in the Hall Bistro

Image by Kaleb via Edmonton Public Schools via Flickr

by Howard Zinn
Writer, Dandelion Salad
crossposted at www.greanvillepost.com, July 20, 2011
Originally posted August 14, 2011
February 3, 2016

Chapter 6 from A People’s History of the United States.

It is possible, reading standard histories, to forget half the population of the country. The explorers were men, the landholders and merchants men, the political leaders men, the military figures men. The very invisibility of women, the overlooking of women, is a sign of their submerged status.

Continue reading

Cornel West and Richard Wolff: Marxism, Capitalism and Wage Slavery

Unions Behind Labor Day

Image by Democracy Chronicles via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with  and

GRITtv on Jul 28, 2015

A conversation about capitalism with two brilliant minds, Cornel West and Richard D. Wolff, together in a rare joint appearance. Richard D. Wolff is Professor of Economics Emeritus, University of Massachusetts, and author most recently of Capitalism’s Crisis Deepens: Essays on the Global Economic Meltdown 2010- 2014/ Dr. Cornel West has written or edited dozens of books, including classics like Race Matters, and Democracy Matters. His most recent is Black Prophetic Fire, written in conversation with Christa Buschendorf. Also in the show, activist Manju Rajendran tells us about a small business that is successfully operating under an anti-capitalist economic paradigm. And Laura raises questions about the record-setting settlement with BP over drilling disaster in the Gulf Coast.

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Richard D. Wolff: Capitalism’s Stunning Contradiction, Part 1

Unions Behind Labor Day

Image by Democracy Chronicles via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with

TheRealNews on Nov 10, 2014

Richard Wolff says every capitalist tries to systematically reduce wages, then can’t sell what those wage workers have produced.

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Still Reaping a Harvest of Shame by Ralph Nader + Moyers and Company: Fighting for Farmworkers

Now this is a fresh tomato

Image by Dandelion Salad via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

by Ralph Nader
The Nader Page
August 1, 2013

The great reporter Edward R. Murrow titled his 1960 CBS documentary Harvest of Shame on the merciless exploitation of the migrant farmworkers by the large growers and their local government allies. Over fifty years later, it is still the harvest of shame for nearly two million migrant farmworkers who follow the seasons and the crops to harvest our fruits and vegetables.

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Ralph Nader: Income Inequality and The Minimum Wage (HR 1346)

PUT POLITICIANS ON MINIMUM WAGE & WATCH HOW FAST THINGS CHANGE

Image by spike55151 via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

with Ralph Nader

C-SPAN
March 25, 2013

Ralph Nader talked about his Huffington Post piece on income inequality and the growing gap between chief executive officers’ pay and that of the typical wage earner. He responded to telephone calls and electronic communications.

Nancy Calo read news headlines from C-SPAN Radio at the end of the program.

watch via http://www.c-span.org/video/?311703-4/ralph-nader-income-inequality-minimum-wage

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It’s time for a raise to $10.50 now! + Getting Congress to End Wage Slavery by Ralph Nader

Dandelion Salad

by Ralph Nader
The Nader Page
March 5, 2013

July 24:

Image by WisconsinJobsNowb via Flickr

The Harkin/Miller bill to increase the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 (in three years) still does not catch up with the federal minimum wage in 1968, adjusted for inflation, which should be at least $10.50 per hour in 2013.

Since 1968, worker productivity has doubled and all workers have received for this effort is a shrinking minimum wage. In other words, one Walmart worker today does the work that two Walmart workers did in 1968 and receives less pay, inflation adjusted, than either of those workers 45 years ago.

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Indentured Servitude for Seniors: Social Security Garnished for Student Debts by Ellen Brown

by Ellen Brown
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
webofdebt.com
May 11, 2012

Tax the rich, not our future placard

Image by Plashing Vole via Flickr

The Social Security program…represents our commitment as a society to the belief that workers should not live in dread that a disability, death, or old age could leave them or their families destitute. -– President Jimmy Carter, December 20, 1977.

[This law] assures the elderly that America will always keep the promises made in troubled times a half century ago… Continue reading

Noam Chomsky: Education For Whom and For What? (2012)

Noam Chomsky Portrait

Image by thelastminute via Flickr

Dandelion Salad

on Feb 17, 2012

Noam Chomsky, a world-renowned linguist, intellectual and political activist, spoke at the University of Arizona on Feb. 8, 2012. His lecture, “Education: For Whom and For What?” featured a talk on the state of higher education, followed by a question-and-answer session.

Chomsky, an Institute Professor and a Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he worked for more than 50 years, has been concerned with a range of education-related issues in recent years. Among them: How do we characterize the contemporary state of the American education system? What happens to the quality of education when public universities become more privatized? Are public universities in danger of being converted into facilities that produce graduates-as-commodities for the job market? What is the role of activism in education? With unprecedented tuition increases and budget struggles occurring across American campuses, these are questions that are more relevant than ever.

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Whistle While You Work with Michael Parenti and Greg Boozel (2007; must-see)

Sorry video is no longer available.

with Michael Parenti
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
www.michaelparenti.org
August 13, 2011

 on Aug 12, 2011

SIUC undergrad thesis film. The state of the American working class and economy as it stood in 2006/2007. Featuring Michael Parenti & Greg Boozel.

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The Intimately Oppressed by Howard Zinn

by Howard Zinn
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
crossposted at www.greanvillepost.com, July 20, 2011
August 12, 2011

Depiction of Amelia Bloomer wearing the famous...

Image via Wikipedia

Chapter 6 from A People’s History of the United States.

It is possible, reading standard histories, to forget half the population of the country. The explorers were men, the landholders and merchants men, the political leaders men, the military figures men. The very invisibility of women, the overlooking of women, is a sign of their submerged status.

In this invisibility they were something like black slaves (and thus slave women faced a double oppression). The biological uniqueness of women, like skin color and facial characteristics for Negroes, became a basis for treating them as inferiors. True, with women, there was something more practically important in their biology than skin color-their position as childbearers-but this was not enough to account for the general push backward for all of them in society, even those who did not bear children, or those too young or too old for that. Continue reading