NDAA: We Won’t Stop Fighting This by Chris Hedges

by Chris Hedges
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Truthdig
September 17, 2012

NDAA (National Defense Authorization Act)

Image by World Can’t Wait via Flickr

In January I sued President Barack Obama over Section 1021(b)(2) of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which authorized the military to detain U.S. citizens indefinitely, strip them of due process and hold them in military facilities, including offshore penal colonies. Last week, round one in the battle to strike down the onerous provision, one that saw me joined by six other plaintiffs including Noam Chomsky and Daniel Ellsberg, ended in an unqualified victory for the public. U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest, who accepted every one of our challenges to the law, made her temporary injunction of the section permanent. In short, she declared the law unconstitutional.

Almost immediately after Judge Forrest ruled, the Obama administration challenged the decision. Government prosecutors called the opinion “unprecedented” and said that “the government has compelling arguments that it should be reversed.” The government added that it was an “extraordinary injunction of worldwide scope.”

[…]

via Truthdig


Chris Hedges spent two decades as a foreign reporter covering wars in Latin America, Africa, Europe and the Middle East. His latest books are Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt, Death of the Liberal Class, and The World as It Is: Dispatches on the Myth of Human Progress.

Copyright © 2012 Truthdig

see

Chris Hedges: The Assault on Civil Liberties Under Obama More Egregious Than Under Bush + Carl Mayer: They Can’t Chill Your Freedom of Speech

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Chris Hedges: NDAA Allows For Indefinite Detention, Which In An Age Of Permanent War Is A Very Long Time