Michael Hudson: The Orwellian Double-Think That Is Used To Confuse People And Make Them Think That Poverty Is Wealth (Parts 1-5)

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with Michael Hudson
Writer, Dandelion Salad
Michael Hudson
March 5, 2017

TheRealNews on Feb 26, 2017

Michael Hudson, author of the newly released J is for Junk Economics, says the media and academia use well-crafted euphemisms to conceal how the economy really works.

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The kleptocratic mayor of New York by Danny Lucia

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by Danny Lucia
SocialistWorker.org
July 14, 2010

IN THE past year, the mayor of New York City has become $2 billion richer while his city has grown $1 billion poorer.

When this type of thing happens in a country in Africa or Central Asia, we call it a “failed state.” Their failure, apparently, is a lack of subtlety. Looting your country’s grain reserves to build the world’s largest tetherball arena makes you a kleptocratic dictator. But if you get stinking rich selling information technology to the banks that have looted your treasury through bailouts, well, you’re just Mayor Mike.

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World Economic Crisis: Latvia’s Neoliberal Madness by Prof. Michael Hudson and Prof. Jeff Sommers

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by Prof Michael Hudson and Prof. Jeff Sommers
Global Research, February 15, 2010

While most of the world’s press focuses on Greece (and also Spain, Ireland and Portugal) as the most troubled euro-areas, the much more severe, more devastating and downright deadly crisis in the post-Soviet economies scheduled to join the Eurozone somehow has escaped widespread notice.

No doubt that is because their experience is an indictment of the destructive horror of neoliberalism – and of Europe’s policy of treating these countries not as promised, not as helping them develop along Western European lines, but as areas to be colonized as export markets and bank markets, stripped of their economic surpluses, their skilled labor and indeed, working-age labor generally, their real estate and buildings, and whatever was inherited from the Soviet era.

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