Cornel West: They Call Obama a Muslim, Not True; They Call Him a Socialist, Definitely Not True

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Introduction by Chris Hedges

LeighaCohen on Nov 15, 2014

Cornel West at Calvin College 5

Image by James Stewart via Flickr

[…] In his new book, Cornel West, together with distinguished scholar Christa Buschendorf, provides a fresh perspective on six revolutionary African American leaders: Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King Jr., Ella Baker, Malcolm X, and Ida B. Wells. He examines the impact of these men and women on their own eras and across the decades. He not only rediscovers the integrity and commitment within these passionate advocates but also their fault lines.

West describes Douglass as a complex man who is both “the towering Black freedom fighter of the nineteenth century” and a product of his time who lost sight of the fight for civil rights after the emancipation. He calls Du Bois “undeniably the most important Black intellectual of the twentieth century” and explores the more radical aspects of his thinking in order to understand his uncompromising critique of the United States, which has been omitted from the American collective memory. West argues that our selective memory has sanitized and even “Santaclausified” Martin Luther King Jr., rendering him less radical, and has marginalized Ella Baker, who embodies the grassroots organizing of the civil rights movement. The controversial Malcolm X, who is often seen as a proponent of reverse racism, hatred, and violence, has been demonized in a false opposition with King, while the appeal of his rhetoric and sincerity to students has been sidelined. Ida B. Wells, West argues, shares Malcolm X’s radical spirit and fearless speech, but has “often become the victim of public amnesia.” […]

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The Ordination Service for Chris Hedges, with Cornel West

Rejoice

Image by Eric E Castro via Flickr

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Hallelujah! Blessings to Chris and his family on his ordination. ~Lo

with Chris Hedges

LeighaCohen on Oct 10, 2014

This video features the laying of the hands on Chris Hedges with Cornell West preaching about the many facets of Chris Hedges who he gives homage to. Then Chris who is now ordained returns to the pulpit to speak for the first time before the congregation and visitors. The of the Ordination Services for Chris Hedges took place at the Second Presbyterian Church Elizabeth, NJ on October 5, 2014.

Chris has been a political activist and writer in many areas including working towards changing the US issue of mass incarceration and how it treats its prisoners. Chris currently teaches prisoners in prison where Cornel West and others have also volunteered their time. http://www.secpreseliz.org/ministries. Chris earned a Master of Divinity from Harvard Divinity School many years ago.

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Mumia Abu-Jamal: The Meeting of the Nerds: Cornel West, James Cone and Chris Hedges

Mumia Abu-Jamal

Image by Prison Radio via Flickr

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mumiathemovie on Jun 19, 2013

Stephen Vittoria, director of “Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary”, speaks with Mumia Abu-Jamal on: Edward Snowden; Mumia’s recent visit w/Chris Hedges, James Cone, and Cornel West; the release of “Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary” on DVD; and the forthcoming book “Murder Incorporated: Empire, Genocide, and Manifest Destiny” currently being written by Vittoria and Mumia.

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The Gospel of the Penniless, Jobless, Marginalized and Despised by Chris Hedges

by Chris Hedges
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Truthdig
Jan. 9, 2012

English: A statue of Jesus being crucified in ...

Image via Wikipedia

“The Cross and the Lynching Tree are separated by nearly two thousand years,” writes in his new book, “The Cross and the Lynching Tree.” “One is the universal symbol of the Christian faith; the other is the quintessential symbol of black oppression in America. Though both are symbols of death, one represents a message of hope and salvation, while the other signifies the negation of that message by white supremacy. Despite the obvious similarities between Jesus’ death on the cross and the death of thousands of black men and women strung up to die on a lamppost or tree, relatively few people, apart from the black poets, novelists, and other reality-seeing artists, have explored the symbolic connections. Yet, I believe this is the challenge we must face. What is at stake is the credibility and the promise of the Christian gospel and the hope that we may heal the wounds of racial violence that continue to divide our churches and our society.”

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via Truthdig

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Turning King’s Dream into a Nightmare by Chris Hedges

by Chris Hedges
Featured Writer
Dandelion Salad
Truthdig
Jan. 18, 2010 Continue reading