Western Media Make One Death a Tragedy, Millions a Statistic by Finian Cunningham + US Facilitates Saudi War Crimes in Yemen

002 Rally

Image by Felton Davis via Flickr

by Finian Cunningham
Writer, Dandelion Salad
East Africa
Crossposted from Strategic Culture Foundation
October 31, 2018

The Western media coverage devoted to the murdered Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi proves the cynical adage that one person’s death is a tragedy, while millions of deaths are a mere statistic.

During the past four weeks since Khashoggi went missing at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, the case has been constantly in the news cycle. Contrast that with the sparse coverage in Western news media of the horrific Saudi war in Yemen during the past four years.

The United Nations has again recently warned that 16 million in Yemen were facing death from starvation as a result of the war waged on that country by Saudi Arabia and its Gulf Arab partners, with the crucial military support of the US, Britain and France. That imminent death toll hardly registered a response from Western media or governments.

Last week, some 21 Yemeni workers at a vegetable packing plant near the Red Sea port of Hodeida were killed after US-backed Saudi warplanes launched air strikes. Again, hardly any condemnation was registered by Western governments and media pundits.

Admittedly, some politicians in the US and Europe are lately expressing disdain over the Saudi-led war and the possible culpability of Western governments in crimes against humanity.

Nevertheless, in proportion to the public concern devoted to the killing of Jamal Khashoggi there is a staggering indifference in relation to Yemen. How is possible that the fate of one man can provoke so much emotion and angst, while millions of children in Yemen appear to be shrugged off as “collateral damage”.

Partly, the circumstances of Khashoggi’s murder by a Saudi death squad are more easily visualized. His connections as a journalist working for the Washington Post also ensures ample interest from other media outlets. Photos of the 59-year-old Saudi dissident and his personal story of going to the consulate in Istanbul to obtain official papers for an upcoming wedding to his Turkish fiancée also provided a human identity, which then garners public empathy.

Another factor is the macabre plot to trap him, torture and dismember his body by a Saudi hit team who appear to have been acting on orders from senior Saudi regime officials. Khashoggi’s bodily remains have yet to be recovered which adds to the interest in the grisly story.

Regrettably, these human dimensions are all-too often missing in the massive suffering inflicted on Yemen. Thousands of children killed in air strikes and millions perishing from disease and starvation have an abstract reality.

When Western media do carry rare reports on children being killed, as in the Saudi air strike on a school bus on August 9, which massacred over 50, the public is still relatively insensate. We are not told the victims’ names nor shown photographs of happy children before their heinous fate.

However, the contrast between one man’s death and millions of abstract deaths – all the more salient because the culprits are the same in both cases – is not due simply to human callousness. It is due to the way Western media have desensitized the Western public from their appalling lack of coverage on Yemen.

The Western media have an urgent obligation because their governments are directly involved in the suffering of Yemen. If the Western media gave appropriately more coverage with human details of victims then it is fair to assume that there would be much greater public outrage over Yemen and an outcry for justice – at least in the form of halting arms sales to Saudi Arabia. Such calls are being made over the Khashoggi case. Surely, the same calls for economic and diplomatic sanctions should therefore be made with regard to Yemen – indeed orders of magnitude greater given the much greater scale of human suffering.

The Western news media have been shamefully derelict in reporting on Yemen’s horror over the past four years. One of the most despicable headlines was from the BBC which described it as a “forgotten war”. The conflict is only “forgotten” because the BBC and other Western news outlets have chosen to routinely drop it from their coverage. That omission is without doubt a “political” decision taken in order to not discomfit Washington, London or Paris in their lucrative arms trade with the Saudi regime.

Another way at looking at the paradox of “one death a tragedy, a million a statistic” and the Western media’s nefarious role in creating that paradox is to consider the fate of individuals facing death sentences in Saudi Arabia.

Take the case of female pro-democracy protester 29-year-old Israa al Ghomgham. Israa was arrested three years ago because she participated in peaceful protests against the Saudi monarchy. She and her husband Moussa al Hashem are facing execution any day by decapitation. Their only “crime” was to participate in non-violent street demonstrations in Saudi’s eastern provincial city of Qatif, calling for democratic rights for the Sunni kingdom’s oppressed Shia minority.

Another case is that of Mujtaba al Sweikat. He also is facing death by beheading, again because he was involved in pro-democracy protests against the absolute Saudi rulers. What makes his case even more deplorable is that he was arrested in 2012 at the age of 17 – legally a minor – when he was leaving the country to take up studies at Western Michigan University in the United States.

It is not clear if these individuals – and there are many more such cases on Saudi death row – will be spared by the Saudi monarchy in the light of the international condemnations over the Khashoggi killing. Any day, they could be hauled to a public square and their heads hacked off with a sword.

If we try to explain the disconnect in Western public reaction to the Khashoggi case, on one hand, and on the other, the massive misery of Yemen, one might invoke the cynical adage about a single death versus millions. But then how does that explain the apparent lack of public concern over the imminent death of individuals such as Israa al Ghomgham, her husband Moussa, or the student Mujtaba al Sweitat?

The tragedy of desensitized abstraction is not due to overwhelming numbers. It is primarily due to the willful omission – and worse, misinformation – by Western media on the barbarity of the Saudi regime and the crucially enabling support given to this regime by Western politics and economics.

The apparent disconnect is due to systematic Western media distortion. That’s not just a flaw. It is criminal complicity.


Finian Cunningham, is a columnist at the Strategic Culture Foundation, Sputnik, and a Writer on Dandelion Salad. He can be reached at cunninghamfinian@gmail.com.

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[DS added the video reports.]

US Facilitates Saudi War Crimes in Yemen

The Peace Report on Oct 31, 2018

Join The Peace Report to fight empire one video at a time: Weekly Newsletter

‘Unlikely UK will end arms deal with Saudis’: US officials call for ceasefire in Yemen

RT on Oct 31, 2018

Two senior US officials have publicly called for a ceasefire in Yemen. But apparently US allies are not expected to be the first to stop the violence, even if Washington has the clout to make them.

Read more: https://www.rt.com/usa/442691-pompeo-mattis-yemen-ceasefire/

‘What War In Yemen?’

RT America on Oct 30, 2018

Despite the inexorable role of US and UK arms-dealers in the Saudi-led coalition’s brutal campaign in Yemen, the apathy of establishment media toward the plight of the Yemenis has created a lack of serious public awareness of the conflict and especially of the extent of US and UK involvement.

Blissful ignorance? 42% of Brits unaware of Yemen war despite arming Saudis

RT on Oct 30, 2018

Almost half of the British public are unaware a war is going on in Yemen, a Yougov poll has revealed, as a Labour MP accuses the government of having “blood on its hands” while it continues to sell arms to Saudi Arabia.

Read more: https://www.rt.com/uk/442614-yemen-war-british-public/

Updated: Oct. 31, 2018

Catastrophic Death Toll in US-Saudi War on Yemen Has Been Grossly Downplayed

on Oct 31, 2018

The UN and corporate media have for years claimed only 10,000 Yemenis were killed in the US/UK-backed Saudi/UAE war. But Yemen’s actual death toll is 70,000 to 80,000. Patrick Cockburn on the whitewashing of the catastrophic war.

Transcript

See also:

Khashoggi’s Murder and Saudi War Crimes in Yemen Were Facilitated by US by Marjorie Cohn

The Yemen war death toll is five times higher than we think – we can’t shrug off our responsibilities any longer by Patrick Cockburn

from the archives:

Time to End the Ruinous U.S. Alliance with Saudi Arabia by Gareth Porter + Saudi-led Coalition Airstrike Kills 21 Civilians in Yemeni Market

Did Saudis, CIA Fear Khashoggi 9/11 Bombshell? by Finian Cunningham

Macabre Saudi Disappearance Shatters Western Media’s Illusion of “Reforming” Crown Prince by Finian Cunningham + Turkey Says Critical Saudi Journalist Was Killed in Saudi Consulate”

Howard Zinn: We Should Welcome the Collapse of the US Empire

What If Governments Obeyed Laws? by David Swanson + Merchants of Death: How the Military-Industrial Complex Profits from Endless War

No Liberal Rallies Yet for the Children of Yemen by Paul Street + The U.S.-Backed War That Is Tormenting Yemen by David Moulton

Chris Hedges: 80% of the Yemen Population Needs Humanitarian Aid + Catastrophic US-Saudi-UAE Attack on Yemen Port City Could Trigger Mass Famine

Why Saudi Public Relations Are So Disastrous by Finian Cunningham

When Did Congress Vote to Aid the Saudi’s Yemen War? by Gareth Porter + Larry Wilkerson: U.S is Backing Saudi War Crimes in Yemen

How Casual The Slaughter, by Felicity Arbuthnot

Chris Hedges: Saudi Arabia–The Number One Purchaser of US Weapons

2 thoughts on “Western Media Make One Death a Tragedy, Millions a Statistic by Finian Cunningham + US Facilitates Saudi War Crimes in Yemen

  1. Pingback: US, Britain Push Yemen Ceasefire as Tactic to Defeat Houthis by Finian Cunningham + Wilkerson: US & UK Not Truly Committed to Ending Saudi ‘Total War’ on Yemen – Dandelion Salad

  2. Pingback: Chris Hedges, Noam Chomsky and Khaled Abou El Fadl: Religious Nationalism and the American-Israeli-Saudi Alliance – Dandelion Salad

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